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On the Contributions of Barbara Bergmann to Economics


  • Paulette Olson


This paper examines the major economic contributions of Barbara R. Bergmann. After presenting her personal background information, it gives an overview of her theoretical framework. This is followed by her critique of economic methodology and an examination of her major contributions in micro-simulation, feminist analysis of labor markets and the family, and policy-oriented work focused on improving the lives of women and children. The essay concludes with a brief discussion of Bergmann's unique qualities as an activist economist in the pursuit of social change.

Suggested Citation

  • Paulette Olson, 2007. "On the Contributions of Barbara Bergmann to Economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 475-496.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:19:y:2007:i:4:p:475-496 DOI: 10.1080/09538250701622303

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1970. "Some Approaches to the Theory and Measurement of Total Factor Productivity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 1137-1177, December.
    7. E. H. Phelps Brown, 1957. "The Meaning of the Fitted Cobb-Douglas Function," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 546-560.
    8. Jesus Felipe & Carsten Holz, 2001. "Why do Aggregate Production Functions Work? Fisher's simulations, Shaikh's identity and some new results," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 261-285.
    9. Chang-Tai Hsieh, 2002. "What Explains the Industrial Revolution in East Asia? Evidence From the Factor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(3), pages 502-526, June.
    10. Simon, Herbert A, 1979. "Rational Decision Making in Business Organizations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(4), pages 493-513, September.
    11. Samuelson, Paul A, 1979. "Paul Douglas's Measurement of Production Functions and Marginal Productivities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 923-939, October.
    12. Nelson, Richard R, 1981. "Research on Productivity Growth and Productivity Differences: Dead Ends and New Departures," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 1029-1064, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Neugart & Matteo G. Richiardi, 2012. "Agent-based models of the labor market," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 125, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.

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