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Another look at the rate of increase in TFP in China

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  • Gregory Chow

Abstract

There has been some controversy concerning the rate of growth of total factor productivity after economic reform started in China in 1978. It is the purpose of this note to present evidence to show that an annual rate of increase of about 2.7% is reliable and that the capital elasticity of output is close to 0.6. I first present time series evidence and then supporting evidence from other sources.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Chow, 2008. "Another look at the rate of increase in TFP in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 219-224.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:6:y:2008:i:2:p:219-224 DOI: 10.1080/14765280802028344
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shandre M. Thangavelu & Ang Beng Jiunn & James, 2004. "Financial development and economic growth in Australia: An empirical analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 247-260.
    2. Tsangyao Chang, 2002. "Financial development and economic growth in Mainland China: a note on testing demand-following or supply-leading hypothesis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(13), pages 869-873.
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    5. Yan Wang & Yudong Yao, 2001. "Sources of China's economic growth, 1952-99 : incorporating human capital accumulation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2650, The World Bank.
    6. Levine, Ross, 2005. "Finance and Growth: Theory and Evidence," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 12, pages 865-934 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. M. Herrerias & Vicente Orts, 2012. "Equipment investment, output and productivity in China," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 181-207.
    2. Scherngell, Thomas & Borowiecki, Martin & Hu, Yuanjia, 2014. "Effects of knowledge capital on total factor productivity in China: A spatial econometric perspective," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 82-94.
    3. Jiang, Yanqing, 2011. "Understanding openness and productivity growth in China: An empirical study of the Chinese provinces," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 290-298, September.
    4. Jinghai Zheng & Angang Hu & Arne Bigsten, 2009. "Potential output in a rapidly developing economy: the case of China and a comparison with the United States and the European Union," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 317-342.
    5. Chen, Shiyi & Jefferson, Gary H. & Zhang, Jun, 2011. "Structural change, productivity growth and industrial transformation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 133-150, March.
    6. repec:spr:chfecr:v:4:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1186_s40589-016-0027-x is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Maria Jesus Herrerias & Vicente Orts, 2011. "The driving forces behind China’s growth," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(1), pages 79-124, January.

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    Keywords

    China; total factor productivity;

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