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Teaching Critical Thinking with Electronic Discussion


  • Steven A. Greenlaw
  • Stephen B. Deloach


One of the products of a liberal undergraduate education is the ability to think critically. In practice, critical thinking is a skill that economics students are supposed to master as they complete their studies. However, exactly what critical thinking means is generally not well defined. Building on the literature on critical thinking, the authors examine how electronic discussion can be used effectively to teach this skill. Because of the multiplicity of views expressed, the asynchronous nature of the technology, and the inherent positive spillovers that are created, electronic discussion appears to provide a natural framework for teaching critical thinking.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven A. Greenlaw & Stephen B. Deloach, 2003. "Teaching Critical Thinking with Electronic Discussion," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 36-52, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:34:y:2003:i:1:p:36-52 DOI: 10.1080/00220480309595199

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles A. Holt & Monica Capra, 2000. "Classroom Games: A Prisoner's Dilemma," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 229-236, September.
    2. Reinhard Selten, 1973. "A Simple Model of Imperfect Competition, where 4 are Few and 6 are Many," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 008, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    3. Nagel, Rosemarie, 1995. "Unraveling in Guessing Games: An Experimental Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1313-1326, December.
    4. Brauer, Jurgen & Delemeester, Greg, 2001. " Games Economists Play: A Survey of Non-computerized Classroom-Games for College Economics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 221-236, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Costas Siriopoulos & Gerasimos Pomonis, 2009. "Selecting Strategies to Foster Economists' Critical Thinking Skills: A Quantile Regression Approach," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(1), pages 106-131.
    2. Mary O. Borg & Harriet A. Stranahan, 2010. "Evidence On The Relationship Between Economics And Critical Thinking Skills," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(1), pages 80-93, January.
    3. Dubas, Justin M. & Toledo, Santiago A., 2016. "Taking higher order thinking seriously: Using Marzano’s taxonomy in the economics classroom," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 12-20.
    4. Stephen B. Deloach & Steven A. Greenlaw, 2005. "Do Electronic Discussions Create Critical Thinking Spillovers?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(1), pages 149-163, January.
    5. Timothy C. Haab & Aaron Schiff & John C. Whitehead, 2011. "Economics Blogs and Economic Education," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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