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Can Foreign Health Assistance Reduce the Medical Brain Drain?


  • Yasser Moullan


In this article, we analyse the impact of foreign health aid on the emigration rates of physicians. The analysis is based on a dataset of physician emigration rates from 50 source countries between 1998 and 2004. First, we investigate the direct impact of health assistance using the generalised method of moments estimation, and we highlight the significant negative effect of foreign health assistance on the medical brain drain. Second, we show that this effect results more from technical assistance than from financial assistance. Finally, the robustness of our analysis is verified to confirm the validity of the results.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasser Moullan, 2013. "Can Foreign Health Assistance Reduce the Medical Brain Drain?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 1436-1452, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:49:y:2013:i:10:p:1436-1452
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2013.794261

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    Cited by:

    1. Driouchi, Ahmed, 2014. "Evidence and Prospects of Shortage and Mobility of Medical Doctors: A Literature Survey," MPRA Paper 59322, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Elsy Thomas kizhakethalackal & Debasri Mukherjee & Eskander Alvi, 2015. "Count-data Analysis of physician Emigration from Developing Countries: A Note," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1177-1184.
    3. Christopher R. Parsons & L. Alan Winters, 2014. "International migration, trade and aid: a survey," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 4, pages 65-112 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Axel Dreher & Andreas Fuchs & Sarah Langlotz, 2018. "The Effects of Foreign Aid on Refugee Flows," CESifo Working Paper Series 6885, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Driouchi, Ahmed & Achehboune, Amale, 2015. "North-South Cooperation in Medical Education and Research: The European Union and South Mediterranean Economies," MPRA Paper 67345, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development


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