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Is there Evidence of Learning-by-Exporting in Turkish Manufacturing Industries?

Author

Listed:
  • Mahmut Yasar
  • Philip Garcia
  • Carl Nelson
  • Roderick Rejesus

Abstract

Exporting has always been thought of as one tool to improve productivity and, consequently, to spur economic growth in low- to middle-income economies. However, empirical evidence of this so-called 'learning-by-exporting' effect has been limited. This article determines whether learning-by-exporting is evident in two Turkish manufacturing sectors—the textile and apparel (T&A) and the motor vehicle and parts (MV&P) industries. A semi-parametric estimator that controls for problems associated with simultaneity and unobserved plant heterogeneity is used to test the learning-by-exporting hypothesis. After controlling for these issues, our results suggest statistically stronger learning-by-exporting effects in the T&A than in the MV&P industry. The highly concentrated and capital-intensive nature of the MV&P industry is the main reason for the lower learning-by-exporting effect in this sector. From a policy perspective, this implies that targeting export-enhancing policies to industries with significant learning-by-exporting effects may lead to more productivity gains and would better stimulate an export-led growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahmut Yasar & Philip Garcia & Carl Nelson & Roderick Rejesus, 2007. "Is there Evidence of Learning-by-Exporting in Turkish Manufacturing Industries?," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 293-305.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:21:y:2007:i:2:p:293-305 DOI: 10.1080/02692170701189193
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marva Corley & Jonathan Michie & Christine Oughton, 2002. "Technology, Growth and Employment," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 265-276.
    2. Rinaldo Evangelista & Tore Sandven & Giorgio Sirilli & Keith Smith, 1998. "Measuring Innovation in European Industry," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 311-333.
    3. Jeroen Hinloopen, 2003. "Innovation performance across Europe," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 145-161.
    4. Jonathan Michie & Christine Oughton & Mario Pianta, 2002. "Innovation and the Economy," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 253-264.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Maria Ferragina & Fernanda Mazzotta & Erol Taymaz & Kamil Yilmaz, 2013. "The Impact Of Fdi On Firm Survival And Employment: A Comparative Analysis For Turkey And Italy," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1211, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Anna Maria Ferragina & Fernanda Mazzotta & Erol Taymaz & Kamil Yilmaz, 2013. "The Impact Of Fdi On Firm Survival And Employment: A Comparative Analysis For Turkey And Italy," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1211, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Aslihan Atabek Demirhan, 2016. "To be exporter or not to be exporter? Entry–exit dynamics of Turkish manufacturing firms," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 181-200.
    4. Bruno Merlevede & Matthijs De Zwaan & Karolien Lenaerts & Victoria Purice, 2015. "Multinational Networks, Domestic,and Foreign Firms in Europe," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 15/900, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

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