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Why Are Women Delaying Motherhood in Germany?

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  • Laura Romeu Gordo

Abstract

German fertility trends show that the average age at which women have their first child has increased in recent decades. Moreover, researchers have argued that delayed maternity is an important factor in reduced fertility. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), this paper contributes to the debate about maternity timing and reduced fertility in Germany by analyzing some of the factors determining the delay of motherhood. The results suggest that German women who have accumulated more years of education and longer work experience at the time of marriage delay motherhood more. On the other hand, women with higher labor income and a higher contribution to household income delay motherhood less. The results confirm that women consolidate their careers before motherhood in order to reduce career costs. Therefore, if fertility rates are to be increased in Germany further policies that aim to combine women's careers and motherhood need to be developed.

Suggested Citation

  • Laura Romeu Gordo, 2009. "Why Are Women Delaying Motherhood in Germany?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 57-75.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:15:y:2009:i:4:p:57-75 DOI: 10.1080/13545700903153955
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stijn Baert, 2014. "Career lesbians. Getting hired for not having kids?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(6), pages 543-561, November.
    2. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext202 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eeb:articl:v:3:y:2017:n:1:p:67-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stijn Baert & Ann-Sophie De Pauw & Nick Deschacht, 2016. "Do Employer Preferences Contribute to Sticky Floors?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 69(3), pages 714-736, May.

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    Keywords

    Delay of motherhood; fertility timing;

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