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Research Joint Ventures with Asymmetric Spillovers and Symmetric Contributions


  • Gamal Atallah


The paper proposes a new type of R&D cooperation between firms endowed with asymmetric spillovers, which we call symmetric Research Joint Venture (RJV) cartelization, based on reciprocity in information exchange. In this setting, firms coordinate their R&D expenditures and also share information, but such that the asymmetric spillover rates are increased through cooperation by equal amounts. It is found that this type of cooperation reduces R&D investment by the low spillover firm when its spillover is sufficiently low and the spillover of its competitor is sufficiently high. But it always increases the R&D of the high spillover firm, as well as total R&D (and hence effective cost reduction and welfare). A firm prefers no cooperation to symmetric RJV cartelization if its spillover rate is very high and the spillover rate of its competitor is intermediate. The profitability of symmetric RJV cartelization relative to other modes of cooperation is analyzed. It is found that symmetric RJV cartelization constitutes an equilibrium for a very wide range of spillovers, namely, when asymmetries between spillovers are not too large. As these asymmetries increase, the equilibrium goes from symmetric RJV cartelization, to RJV cartelization, to R&D competition, to R&D cartelization.

Suggested Citation

  • Gamal Atallah, 2007. "Research Joint Ventures with Asymmetric Spillovers and Symmetric Contributions," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(7), pages 559-586.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:16:y:2007:i:7:p:559-586 DOI: 10.1080/10438590600919519

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Eren Inci, 2009. "R&D tax incentives: a reappraisal," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(6), pages 797-821, December.
    2. Duarte Leite & Pedro Campos & Isabel Mota, 2011. "Computational Results on Membership in R&D Cooperation Networks: To Be or Not To Be in a Research Joint Venture," FEP Working Papers 420, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. Ouchida, Yasunori & Goto, Daisaku, 2016. "Environmental research joint ventures and time-consistent emission tax: Endogenous choice of R&D formation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 179-188.
    4. Yasunori Ouchida & Daisaku Goto, 2012. "What is the socially desirable formation of environmental R&D?," IDEC DP2 Series 2-6, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    5. Yasunori Ouchida & Daisaku Goto, 2014. "Environmental Research Joint Ventures and Time-Consistent Emission Tax," Working Papers 2014.35, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.


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