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Central city crime and suburban economic growth

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  • Ray Burnham
  • Robert Feinberg
  • Thomas Husted

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between inner-city crime patterns and suburban income growth, analysing data on 318 US counties for selected metropolitan statistical areas of 32 states within the United States from 1982 to 1997. The findings suggest that violent crime does seem to have a negative impact on close-in suburbs, with a less negative impact farther away from the central city (becoming positive at some point). While results are not as robust as we had hoped they are consistent with flight to further-out suburbs rather than migration to different metropolitan areas in response to urban crime.

Suggested Citation

  • Ray Burnham & Robert Feinberg & Thomas Husted, 2004. "Central city crime and suburban economic growth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 917-922.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:9:p:917-922
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000233131
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bradford, David F & Kelejian, Harry H, 1973. "An Econometric Model of the Flight to the Suburbs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 566-589, May-June.
    2. Graves, Philip E., 1979. "A life-cycle empirical analysis of migration and climate, by race," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 135-147, April.
    3. Greenwood, Michael J & Hunt, Gary L, 1984. "Migration and Interregional Employment Redistribution in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 957-969, December.
    4. Mills, Edwin S. & Price, Richard, 1984. "Metropolitan suburbanization and central city problems," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-17, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Niño & Roberto Coronado & Thomas Fullerton & Adam Walke, 2015. "Cross-border homicide impacts on economic activity in El Paso," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1543-1559, December.
    2. Jesús María Cárdenas & Néstor Juan Sanabria, 2013. "Reflexiones en torno a la economía del delito," DIMENSIÓN EMPRESARIAL, UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DEL CARIBE, November.
    3. repec:eee:touman:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:257-269 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Goulas, Eleftherios & Zervoyianni, Athina, 2015. "Economic growth and crime: Is there an asymmetric relationship?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 286-295.
    5. Thomas A. Garrett & Lesli S. Ott, 2008. "City business cycles and crime," Working Papers 2008-026, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    6. Kumar, Surender, 2013. "Crime and Economic Growth: Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 48794, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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