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Defence spending, economic growth and temporal causality: evidence from Taiwan and mainland China, 1952-1995

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  • Tsangyao Chang
  • Wenshwo Fang
  • Li-Fang Wen
  • Chwenchi Liu

Abstract

This paper uses a cointegration analysis and a vector autoregressive model (VAR) to examine the causal relationship between defence spending and economic growth for Taiwan and Mainland China over the period 1952-1995. It is found that these two variables are not cointegrated for both countries studied. The results of the Granger causality tests suggest bidirectional Granger causality (feedback) between defence spending and economic growth for Taiwan, unidirectional Granger causality running from economic growth to defence spending for Mainland China, and unidirectional Granger causality running from Taiwan's defence spending to Mainland China's defence spending for cross-country studied. These results further indicate that there exists no arms race between two countries from both sides of Taiwan strait. Furthermore, impulse responses and variance decompositions are incorporated into the analysis. The results from the impulse responses and variance decompositions tell a similar story.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsangyao Chang & Wenshwo Fang & Li-Fang Wen & Chwenchi Liu, 2001. "Defence spending, economic growth and temporal causality: evidence from Taiwan and mainland China, 1952-1995," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(10), pages 1289-1299.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:10:p:1289-1299
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840122529
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    Cited by:

    1. Tsangyao Chang & Chien-Chiang Lee & Hsiao-Ping Chu, 2015. "Revisiting the Defense-Growth nexus in European countries," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 341-356, June.
    2. Ourania Dimitraki & Faek Menla Ali, 2015. "The Long-run Causal Relationship Between Military Expenditure and Economic Growth in China: Revisited," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 311-326, June.
    3. Chien-Chiang Lee & Sheng-Tung Chen, 2007. "Non-Linearity In The Defence Expenditure - Economic Growth Relationship In Taiwan," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(6), pages 537-555.
    4. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2010. "Growth, investment and military expenditure in the European Union-15," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 228-240, May.
    5. Ming Zhong & Tsangyao Chang & Samrat Goswami & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "The Nexus between Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in the BRICS and the US: A Bootstrap Panel Causality Test," Working Papers 201449, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    6. Henryk Gurgul & Łukasz Lach & Roland Mestel, 2012. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 20(1), pages 161-182, March.
    7. Gurgul, Henryk & Lach, Łukasz, 2011. "Causality analysis between public expenditure and economic growth of Polish economy in last decade," MPRA Paper 52281, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Chen, Pei-Fen & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2014. "The nexus between defense expenditure and economic growth: New global evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 474-483.
    9. repec:taf:defpea:v:28:y:2017:i:6:p:703-718 is not listed on IDEAS

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