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The link between immigration and trade: Evidence from the United Kingdom

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  • Sourafel Girma
  • Zhihao Yu

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Suggested Citation

  • Sourafel Girma & Zhihao Yu, 2002. "The link between immigration and trade: Evidence from the United Kingdom," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 138(1), pages 115-130, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:138:y:2002:i:1:p:115-130
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02707326
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Keith Head & John Ries, 1998. "Immigration and Trade Creation: Econometric Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 47-62, February.
    2. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
    3. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 2002. "Ethnic Chinese Networks In International Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 116-130, February.
    4. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-116, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    F22;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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