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The Interplay between Educational Achievement, Occupational Success, and Well-Being

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  • Robin Samuel

    ()

  • Manfred Bergman

    ()

  • Sandra Hupka-Brunner

    ()

Abstract

Many studies have examined the effect of life events, education, and income on well-being. Conversely, research concerning well-being as a predictor of life course outcomes is sparse. Diener’s suggestion “to inquire about the effects of well-being on future behavior and success” has, with some exceptions, not yet come to fruition. This article contributes to this body of research. We conceptualize and analyze the interplay between educational achievement, occupational success, and well-being as a complex process. The relationship between these domains is examined drawing on a structure-agency framework derived from Bourdieu and Social Comparison Theory. Social comparison between adolescents and their parents is suggested to be the mechanism explaining the effects of successful and unsuccessful intergenerational transmission of educational achievement and occupational success on well-being. It is further argued that well-being may serve as an individual resource by fostering educational and occupational outcomes. Panel data from the Transition from Education to Employment (TREE) project, a Swiss PISA 2000 follow-up study, was used. The interplay between well-being and successful and unsuccessful intergenerational transfer of educational attainment was analyzed in an autoregressive cross-lagged mixture model framework. Social comparison was found to be related to well-being, while well-being proved to significantly increase the probability of successful intergenerational transfer of educational attainment. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Robin Samuel & Manfred Bergman & Sandra Hupka-Brunner, 2013. "The Interplay between Educational Achievement, Occupational Success, and Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 75-96, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:111:y:2013:i:1:p:75-96
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-011-9984-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Kroll, 2011. "Different Things Make Different People Happy: Examining Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being by Gender and Parental Status," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 157-177, October.
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    6. Ledyard Tucker & Charles Lewis, 1973. "A reliability coefficient for maximum likelihood factor analysis," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 38(1), pages 1-10, March.
    7. David Evans, 1994. "Enhancing quality of life in the population at large," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 47-88, August.
    8. Carmel Proctor & P. Linley & John Maltby, 2010. "Very Happy Youths: Benefits of Very High Life Satisfaction Among Adolescents," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 98(3), pages 519-532, September.
    9. Katariina Salmela-Aro & Heta Tuominen-Soini, 2010. "Adolescents’ Life Satisfaction During the Transition to Post-Comprehensive Education: Antecedents and Consequences," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(6), pages 683-701, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robin Samuel & Andreas Hadjar, 2016. "How Welfare-State Regimes Shape Subjective Well-Being Across Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(2), pages 565-587, November.
    2. Ilse Laurijssen & Bram Spruyt, 2015. "Not for People Like Us? A Six-Year Panel Study of the Mutual Relationship Between Feelings of Relative Deprivation and Occupational Status Among Young Adults in Flanders," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 617-635, November.
    3. Anning Hu, 2015. "The Changing Happiness-Enhancing Effect of a College Degree Under Higher Education Expansion: Evidence from China," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 669-685, June.
    4. repec:kap:sbusec:v:49:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11187-017-9854-x is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kim, Bokyung & Jeong, Jinook, 2017. "Dynamics of adolescents’ life satisfaction and effect of class rank percentile: Evidence from Korean panel data," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 8-28.

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