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Methods for identifying emerging General Purpose Technologies: a case study of nanotechnologies

Author

Listed:
  • Laura I. Schultz

    () (University of Albany)

  • Frederick L. Joutz

    () (The George Washington University)

Abstract

Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science with the potential to generate new and enhance existing products and transform the production process. US patent data is used to track the emergence of nanotechnologies since 1978. The nanotechnologies that have undergone the most development are identified using patent citation data and co-citation patterns of patents are examined to define clusters of related nanotechnologies. The potential for economic impact of the emerging nanotechnologies is assessed using a generality index.

Suggested Citation

  • Laura I. Schultz & Frederick L. Joutz, 2010. "Methods for identifying emerging General Purpose Technologies: a case study of nanotechnologies," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 85(1), pages 155-170, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:85:y:2010:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-010-0244-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-010-0244-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kreuchauff, Florian & Teichert, Nina, 2014. "Nanotechnology as general purpose technology," Working Paper Series in Economics 53, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Management.
    2. Mario Coccia, 2017. "General purpose technologies in dynamic systems: visual representation and analyses of complex drivers," IRCrES Working Paper 201705, Research Institute on Sustainable Economic Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY - former Institute for Economic Research on Firms and Growth - Moncalieri (TO) ITALY.
    3. Mario COCCIA, 2017. "The Fishbone diagram to identify, systematize and analyze the sources of general purpose technologies," Journal of Social and Administrative Sciences, KSP Journals, vol. 4(4), pages 291-303, December.
    4. Liu, Yong & Du, Jun-liang & Yang, Jin-bi & Qian, Wu-yong & Forrest, Jeffrey Yi-Lin, 2019. "An incentive mechanism for general purpose technologies R&D based on the concept of super-conflict equilibrium: Empirical evidence from nano industrial technology in China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 185-197.
    5. Xu, Shuo & Hao, Liyuan & An, Xin & Yang, Guancan & Wang, Feifei, 2019. "Emerging research topics detection with multiple machine learning models," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4).
    6. Kathryn Rudie Harrigan & Yunzhe Fang, 2020. "The financial benefits of persistently high forward citations," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 619-647, April.
    7. Appio, Francesco Paolo & Martini, Antonella & Fantoni, Gualtiero, 2017. "The light and shade of knowledge recombination: Insights from a general-purpose technology," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 154-165.
    8. Ugo Finardi, 2011. "Time relations between scientific production and patenting of knowledge: the case of nanotechnologies," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 89(1), pages 37-50, October.
    9. Laura Schultz, 2011. "Nanotechnology’s triple helix: a case study of the University at Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(5), pages 546-564, October.

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