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Multi-level evolution in population games

Author

Listed:
  • José Canals

    (Dept. of Economics, University of Virginia, USA)

  • Fernando Vega-Redondo

    (Facultad de Económicas and Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, Universidad de Alicante, 03071 Alicante, Spain)

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze a generalization of the evolutionary model of Kandori, Mailath, & Rob (1993) where the population is partitioned into groups and evolution takes place "in parallel" at the following two levels: (i) within groups, at the lower level; among groups, at the higher one. Unlike in their context, efficiency considerations always overcome those of risk-dominance in the process of selecting the long-run equilibrium. This provides an explicitly dynamic basis for a conclusion reminiscent of those put forward in the biological literature by the so-called theories group selection. From a normative viewpoint, it suggests the potential importance of "decentralization", here understood as local and independent interaction.

Suggested Citation

  • José Canals & Fernando Vega-Redondo, 1998. "Multi-level evolution in population games," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 27(1), pages 21-35.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jogath:v:27:y:1998:i:1:p:21-35
    Note: Received April 1995/Revised version October 1996
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sethi, Rajiv & Somanathan, E., 2001. "Preference Evolution and Reciprocity," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 273-297, April.
    2. Luciano Andreozzi, 2005. "Hayek Reads the Literature on the Emergence of Norms," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 227-247, September.
    3. Oechssler, Jorg, 1997. "Decentralization and the coordination problem," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 119-135, January.
    4. Salomonsson, Marcus, 2009. "Group Selection: The quest for social preferences," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 712, Stockholm School of Economics.
    5. Neary, Philip R., 2012. "Competing conventions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 301-328.

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