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Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: Southern Sweden, 1766–1864

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  • Tommy Bengtsson
  • Martin Dribe

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  • Tommy Bengtsson & Martin Dribe, 2006. "Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: Southern Sweden, 1766–1864," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(4), pages 727-746, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:43:y:2006:i:4:p:727-746
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2006.0030
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jan Van Bavel & Jan Kok, 2004. "Birth Spacing in the Netherlands. The Effects of Family Composition, Occupation and Religion on Birth Intervals, 1820–1885," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 20(2), pages 119-140, June.
    2. John C. Brown & Timothy W. Guinnane, 2003. "Two Statistical Problems in the Princeton Project on the European Fertility," Working Papers 869, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Douglas Anderton & Lee Bean, 1985. "Birth spacing and fertility limitation: a behavioral analysis of a nineteenth century frontier population," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(2), pages 169-183, May.
    4. Brown, John C. & Guinnane, Timothy W., 2003. "Two Statistical Problems in the Princeton Project on the European Fertility Transition," Center Discussion Papers 28392, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.
    5. Michael Haines, 1989. "American fertility in transition: New estimates of birth rates in the United States, 1900–1910," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(1), pages 137-148, February.
    6. Timothy Guinnane & Barbara Okun & James Trussell, 1994. "What do we know about the timing of fertility transitions in europe?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(1), pages 1-20, February.
    7. Tommy Bengtsson & Cameron Campbell & James Z. Lee, 2004. "Life Under Pressure: Mortality and Living Standards in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262025515.
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