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Estimating African-American mortality from inaccurate data

Author

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  • Irma Elo
  • Samuel Preston

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Irma Elo & Samuel Preston, 1994. "Estimating African-American mortality from inaccurate data," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(3), pages 427-458, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:31:y:1994:i:3:p:427-458
    DOI: 10.2307/2061751
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2061751
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    Cited by:

    1. Dora L. Costa, 2015. "Health and the Economy in the United States from 1750 to the Present," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 503-570, September.
    2. Robert Bourbeau & André Lebel, 2000. "Mortality statistics for the oldest-old," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(2).
    3. Dan A. Black & Yu-Chieh Hsu & Seth G. Sanders & Lowell J. Taylor, 2017. "Combining forward and backward mortality estimation," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 71(3), pages 281-292, September.
    4. Stephane Helleringer & Chong You & Laurence Fleury & Laetitia Douillot & Insa Diouf & Cheikh Tidiane Ndiaye & Valerie Delaunay & Rene Vidal, 2019. "Improving age measurement in low- and middle-income countries through computer vision: A test in Senegal," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 40(9), pages 219-260.
    5. Catherine G. Massey, 2016. "Playing with Matches: An Assessment of Accuracy in Linked Historical Data," CARRA Working Papers 2016-05, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    6. John Parman, "undated". "Gender and Intergenerational Mobility: Using Health Outcomes to Compare Intergenerational Mobility Across Gender and Over Time," Working Papers 122, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
    7. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2014. "Distinctively black names in the American past," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 64-82.
    8. Marilia Miranda Fortes Gomes & Cássio Turra, 2009. "The number of centenarians in Brazil: Indirect estimates based on death certificates," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(20), pages 495-502.
    9. Teresa Ghilarducci & Kyle Moore, 2015. "Racially Disparate Effects of Raising the Retirement Age," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2015-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    10. Magali Barbieri, 2018. "Investigating the Difference in Mortality Estimates between the Social Security Administration Trustees' Report and the Human Mortality Database," Working Papers wp394, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    11. Kirill F. Andreev, 2004. "A Method for Estimating Size of Population Aged 90 and over with Application to the U.S. Census 2000 Data," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(9), pages 235-262.
    12. Soumaïla Ouedraogo, 2020. "Estimation of older adult mortality from imperfect data: A comparative review of methods using Burkina Faso censuses," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 43(38), pages 1119-1154.
    13. Andrew Fenelon, 2013. "An examination of black/white differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(17), pages 441-472.
    14. Cook, Lisa D. & Logan, Trevon D. & Parman, John M., 2016. "The mortality consequences of distinctively black names," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 114-125.
    15. Bridget Fisher, 2015. "The Myth of Self-Financing: The Trade-Offs Behind the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2015-04, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    16. Dana Glei & Magali Barbieri & Carolina Santamaría-Ulloa, 2019. "Costa Rican mortality 1950‒2013: An evaluation of data quality and trends compared with other countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 40(29), pages 835-864.
    17. Trevon Logan & John Parman, 2014. "The Dynamics of African-American Health: A Historical Perspective," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 299-318, September.
    18. Yi Zeng & James Vaupel, 2003. "Oldest Old Mortality in China," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 8(7), pages 215-244.
    19. Marilia R. Nepomuceno & Cássio M. Turra, 2019. "The population of centenarians in Brazil: historical estimates from 1900 to 2000," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2019-015, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    20. Dmitri A. Jdanov & Domantas Jasilionis & Eugeny L. Soroko & Roland Rau & James W. Vaupel, 2008. "Beyond the Kannisto-Thatcher Database on Old Age Mortality: an assessment of data quality at advanced ages," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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