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Educational effects in an experiment with the management game SINTO-Market

  • Otwin Becker
  • Tanja Feit
  • Vera Hofer


  • Ulrike Leopold-Wildburger
  • Reinhard Selten

This paper examines how the educational background influences the performance of managers’ strategies. The research is based on data collected by an experiment with the management game SINTO-Market. This management game puts the players in a competitive situation in the branded food product sector, within which the subjects take over the role of the managers who have to find out the most successful strategy. From experimental research with this management game we will draw some interesting conclusions about human behavior in complex economic decision-making situations. To investigate educational effects the management game SINTO-Market was performed with students of different educational levels 17 times. The results show some significant differences between graduates and undergraduates. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2007

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Article provided by Springer & Slovak Society for Operations Research & Hungarian Operational Research Society & Czech Society for Operations Research & Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR) & Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research & Croatian Operational Research Society in its journal Central European Journal of Operations Research.

Volume (Year): 15 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 301-308

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Handle: RePEc:spr:cejnor:v:15:y:2007:i:4:p:301-308
DOI: 10.1007/s10100-007-0033-z
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  1. AlexanderJr., John C. & McElreath, Robert B., 1999. "Does education affect how well students forecast the market?," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 253-260.
  2. Patrick Larkey & Joseph B. Kadane & Robert Austin & Shmuel Zamir, 1997. "Skill in Games," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(5), pages 596-609, May.
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