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The Politics of Housing Consumption: Renters as Flawed Consumers on a Master Planned Estate

Author

Listed:
  • Lynda Cheshire

    (School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia, l.cheshire@uq.edu.au)

  • Peter Walters

    (School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia, p.walters@uq.edu.au)

  • Ted Rosenblatt

    (School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia, t.rosenblatt@uq.edu.au)

Abstract

Master planned estates offer package dreams of homeownership to those wanting to live among others who share their lifestyle aspirations. Yet we show in this paper how divisions can arise between housing tenure types, with owner-occupiers constructing private rental tenants as a problem. Extending Bauman’s concept of the flawed consumer using Rose’s writings on ethopolitics, we show how renters are viewed as failing in three domains of social life: aesthetics, ethics and community by undermining the aesthetic value of the neighbourhood and by failing to demonstrate an ethic of care for themselves and others. As a result, the homeowners in this study try to avoid living among rental properties and are disappointed to find that, contrary to expectations, moving to a master planned estate does not guarantee this.

Suggested Citation

  • Lynda Cheshire & Peter Walters & Ted Rosenblatt, 2010. "The Politics of Housing Consumption: Renters as Flawed Consumers on a Master Planned Estate," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(12), pages 2597-2614, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:47:y:2010:i:12:p:2597-2614
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    Cited by:

    1. Kathan, Wolfgang & Matzler, Kurt & Veider, Viktoria, 2016. "The sharing economy: Your business model's friend or foe?," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 59(6), pages 663-672.
    2. Voeth, Markus & Stief, Sarah, 2016. "Sharing Economy: A case of customer-to-customer marketing," Die Unternehmung - Swiss Journal of Business Research and Practice, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 70(1), pages 45-57.
    3. Belk, Russell, 2014. "You are what you can access: Sharing and collaborative consumption online," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(8), pages 1595-1600.
    4. Giana M. Eckhardt & Fleura Bardhi, 2016. "The Relationship between Access Practices and Economic Systems," Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(2), pages 210-225.
    5. Chakravarthi Narasimhan & Purushottam Papatla & Baojun Jiang & Praveen K. Kopalle & Paul R. Messinger & Sridhar Moorthy & Davide Proserpio & Upender Subramanian & Chunhua Wu & Ting Zhu, 2018. "Sharing Economy: Review of Current Research and Future Directions," Customer Needs and Solutions, Springer;Institute for Sustainable Innovation and Growth (iSIG), vol. 5(1), pages 93-106, March.

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