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Economics for the Curious. Inside the Minds of 12 Nobel Laureates


  • Krugman, Paul R.

    (City University of New York)

  • Smith, Vernon L.

    (Chapman University)

  • Solow, Robert M.

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)


Alfred Marshall, the founder of modern economics, once described economics as ‘the study of mankind in the ordinary business of earning a living’. In Economics for the Curious, 12 Nobel Laureates show that ‘the ordinary business of earning a living’ covers a wide range of activities, as they take readers on an engaging tour of some of the everyday issues that can be explored using basic economic principles. Written in the plainest possible language, Nobel Laureates including Paul Krugman, Robert Solow and Vernon Smith confront some of the key issues challenging society today — challenges that claim attention in any phase of the business cycle. The range of topics includes how economic tools can be used to rebuild nations in the aftermath of a war; financing retirement as longevity increases; the sustainable use of natural resources and what governments should really be doing to boost the economy. Economics for the Curious is an accessible but informative display of the kinds of questions economics can illuminate. It will appeal to anyone who has an interest in economics and the world around them, and we hope it will encourage further interest and study in the topic from readers everywhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Krugman, Paul R. & Smith, Vernon L. & Solow, Robert M., 2016. "Economics for the Curious. Inside the Minds of 12 Nobel Laureates," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 5, pages 162-187, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnp:ecopol:ep1658

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Milton Friedman & Anna J. Schwartz, 1963. "A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie63-1, January.
    2. Cassey, Andrew J. & Smith, Ben O., 2014. "Simulating confidence for the Ellison–Glaeser index," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 85-103.
    3. repec:fip:fedgsq:y:2008:x:82 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item


    depression; recession; economic cycles; real estate market; renewable resources; nonrenewable resources;

    JEL classification:

    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development


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