IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Rail integrated communities in Tokyo


  • Calimente, John

    () (Stantec Inc.)


Tokyo’s railway station areas are models of transit-oriented design. To differentiate them from transit-oriented developments (TOD), the term rail integrated community (RIC) has been created to describe these high density, safe, mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly developments around railway stations that act as community hubs, served by frequent, all-day, rail rapid transit and are accessed primarily on foot, by bicycle, or by public transit. Japanese private railways have been instrumental in creating these RICs. Though they receive little financial support from the government, private railways in Japan achieve profitability by diversifying into real estate, retail, and numerous other businesses. Tokyu Corporation is used as the case study to exemplify how government policy and socioeconomic context contributed to the successful private railway model. Ten indicators, such as ridership, population density and mode share are used to analyze two stations created by Tokyu to demonstrate how this model is manifested in Tokyu’s rail integrated communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Calimente, John, 2012. "Rail integrated communities in Tokyo," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 5(1), pages 19-32.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0074

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Pierre Filion & Trudi Bunting & Keith Warriner, 1999. "The Entrenchment of Urban Dispersion: Residential Preferences and Location Patterns in the Dispersed City," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(8), pages 1317-1347, July.
    2. Hamilton, Bruce W, 1982. "Wasteful Commuting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 1035-1051, October.
    3. Hazel A. Morrow-Jones & Mary V. Wenning, 2005. "The Housing Ladder, the Housing Life-cycle and the Housing Life-course: Upward and Downward Movement among Repeat Home-buyers in a US Metropolitan Housing Market," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 42(10), pages 1739-1754, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Levinson, David M., 2013. "Introduction: The Journal of Transport and Land Use enters year six," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 6(1), pages 1-5.
    2. Levinson, David & Zhao, Zhirong Jerry, 2012. "Introduction to the special issue on value capture for transportation finance," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 5(1), pages 1-3.

    More about this item


    Value capture; Property tax; Split-rate land tax; Development intensity; Density; Minnesota;

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0074. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Arlene Mathison) or (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.