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Cash Use in Australia: New Survey Evidence


  • John Bagnall

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Darren Flood

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)


The Reserve Bank has completed its second study of consumers' use of payment instruments. The study indicates that cash remains the most common form of payment by consumers. It is used extensively in situations where average payment values are low and where quick transaction times are preferred. Nonetheless, cash use as a share of total payments has declined, falling as a share of both the number and value of payments. Two important factors contributing to this decline are the substitution of cards for cash use, particularly for low-value payments, and the increasing adoption of online payments.

Suggested Citation

  • John Bagnall & Darren Flood, 2011. "Cash Use in Australia: New Survey Evidence," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 55-62, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:sep2011-07

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Juan Yang & Sylvie Démurger & Shi Li, 2010. "Earnings Differentials between the Public and the Private Sectors in China : Explaining Changing Trends for Urban Locals in the 2000s," Working Papers 1032, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    2. Golley, Jane & Meng, Xin, 2011. "Has China run out of surplus labour?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 555-572.
    3. Jamie Hall & Andrew Stone, 2010. "Demography and Growth," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 15-23, June.
    4. Giles, John & Park, Albert & Zhang, Juwei, 2005. "What is China's true unemployment rate?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 149-170.
    5. Zhao Chen & Ming Lu & Hiroshi Sato, 2009. "Social Networks and Labor Market Entry Barriers: Understanding Inter-industrial Wage Differentials in Urban China," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-084, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Richard Herd & Vincent Koen & Anders Reutersward, 2010. "China's Labour Market in Transition: Job Creation, Migration and Regulation," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 749, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Arango & Yassine Bouhdaoui & David Bounie & Martina Eschelbach & Lola Hernández, 2013. "Cash Management and Payment Choices: A Simulation Model with International Comparisons," Staff Working Papers 13-53, Bank of Canada.
    2. repec:eee:ecmode:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:38-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse & Lola Hernández, 2012. "Cash usage in the Netherlands: How much, where, when, who and whenever one wants?," DNB Occasional Studies 1002, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    4. Arianna Cowling, 2011. "Recent Trends in Counterfeiting," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 63-70, September.
    5. repec:bof:bofrdp:urn:nbn:fi:bof-201511251450 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Codruta Rusu & Helmut Stix, 2017. "Von Bar- und Kartenzahlern – Aktuelle Ergebnisse zur Zahlungsmittelnutzung in Österreich," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 54-85.


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