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David Ricardo, Robert Torrens a autorstvo princípu komparatívnych výhod
[David Ricardo, Robert Torrens and the Origins of the Principle of Comparative Advantage]

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Grančay
  • Nóra Szikorová

Abstract

The authorship of the principle of comparative advantage is generally credited to David Ricardo. Recent papers published in scientific journals have cast doubt on this axiom and have debated roles of Robert Torrens, James Mill and John Stuart Mill in its history. We show many of the arguments used in this debate are unscientific and unverifiable. After conducting an analysis of the history of development of the principle we define the difference between minimum satisfactory and complex formulation of the principle. We come to the conclusion that the first satisfactory explanation of comparative advantage was offered by Robert Torrens.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Grančay & Nóra Szikorová, 2012. "David Ricardo, Robert Torrens a autorstvo princípu komparatívnych výhod
    [David Ricardo, Robert Torrens and the Origins of the Principle of Comparative Advantage]
    ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(3), pages 380-394.
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2012:y:2012:i:3:id:847:p:380-394
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Piero Sraffa & L. Einaudi, 1930. "An Alleged Correction of Ricardo," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(3), pages 539-545.
    2. Aldrich, John, 2004. "The Discovery of Comparative Advantage," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(03), pages 379-399, September.
    3. Maneschi, Andrea, 2004. "The true meaning of David Ricardo's four magic numbers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 433-443, March.
    4. William O. Thweatt, 1976. "James Mill and the Early Development of Comparative Advantage," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 207-234, Summer.
    5. Roy J. Ruffin, 2002. "David Ricardo's Discovery of Comparative Advantage," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 34(4), pages 727-748, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    18th century rule; comparative advantage; relative costs; history of economic science; economics of 19th century;

    JEL classification:

    • B12 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Classical (includes Adam Smith)
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General

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