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The Demand for Children in a "Natural Fertility" Population

Author

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  • DENNIS DE TRAY

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics,)

Abstract

The paper is concerned with two theories that proport to explain fertility variations in developing countries. The first of these theories is based on supply or naturalfertility considerations whilethe second looks to (the underlying) costs and benefits of children as one source explanation for fertility differences. These theories indicate that demand consideration do explain some of the systematic variation in fertility even among "noncontracepting" populations.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis De Tray, 1979. "The Demand for Children in a "Natural Fertility" Population," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 55-67.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:journl:v:18:y:1979:i:1:p:55-67
    as

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    File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/PDR/1979/Volume1/55-67.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert J. Willis, 1974. "Economic Theory of Fertility Behavior," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 25-80, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dennis N. De Tray, 1974. "Child Quality and the Demand for Children," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 91-119, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert T. Michael, 1974. "Education and the Derived Demand for Children," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 120-159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. repec:ucp:bknber:9780226740867 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Yoram Ben-Porath, 1974. "Economic Analysis of Fertility in Israel," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 189-224, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gary S. Becker, 1960. "An Economic Analysis of Fertility," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pages 209-240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Dennis N. De Tray, 1977. "Age of Marriage and Fertility. A Policy Review," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 16(1), pages 89-100.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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