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Inflation Targeting: Theory and Policy Implications

Author

Listed:
  • John H. Green

    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

As with many monetary policy frameworks, inflation targeting is subject to the well-known problem of inflation bias. With inflation targeting, however, the bias becomes apparent not as inflation above desired levels but as a wedge between the announced target and observed inflation. This inconsistency could render the framework neither credible nor enforceable because the target is overshot on average. The problem can be addressed by assigning price stability as the single policy objective or by assigning dual targets for inflation and output, provided that they are consistent. Many inflation-targeting countries take the joint target approach implicitly through transparency measures that publicly assess monetary conditions in terms of potential output and output gaps.

Suggested Citation

  • John H. Green, 1996. "Inflation Targeting: Theory and Policy Implications," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(4), pages 779-795, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:imfstp:v:43:y:1996:i:4:p:779-795
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexis Penot, 1998. "La politique monétaire française à travers la règle de Taylor," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 49(5), pages 135-154.
    2. Guy Debelle & Miguel A Savastano & Paul R Masson & Sunil Sharma, 1998. "Inflation Targeting as a Framework for Monetary Policy," IMF Economic Issues 15, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Stanley Fischer, 1996. "Why are central banks pursuing long-run price stability?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 7-34.
    4. Csermely, Ágnes, 1997. "Az inflációs célkitűzés rendszere
      [Inflation targeting]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(3), pages 233-253.
    5. Devine, Máiréad & McCoy, Daniel, 1997. "Inflation Targeting: A Review of the Issues," Research Technical Papers 5/RT/97, Central Bank of Ireland.
    6. Miguel A Savastano & Paul R Masson & Sunil Sharma, 1997. "The Scope for Inflation Targeting in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 97/130, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Iannis A. Mourmouras & Michael G. Arghyrou, 1999. "Monetary Policy at the European Periphery. Greek Experience and Lessons for Transition Economies," CERT Discussion Papers 9910, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    8. Chien-Chiang Lee & Chun-Ping Chang, 2008. "Trend stationary of inflation rates: evidence from LM unit root testing with a long span of historical data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(19), pages 2523-2536.
    9. Siok Kun Sek & Wai Mun Har, 2012. "Does Inflation Targeting Work in Emerging East-Asian Economies?," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 59(5), pages 599-608, December.
    10. Dhaneshwar Ghura & Michael T. Hadjimichael, 1995. "Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 95/136, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Sek Siok Kun, 2012. "Evaluating the performance of inflation targeting regime in three Asian economies," International Econometric Review (IER), Econometric Research Association, vol. 4(2), pages 82-98, September.
    12. Jp Heever, 2001. "A Note On Inflation Targeting In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 69(1), pages 168-177, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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