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Evaluating Social Policies: Principles and U.S. Experience

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  • Grossman, Jean Baldwin

Abstract

Invariably, studies, proposals, and plans for social programs contain a strong recommendation for evaluation and monitoring. Reliable information about what works and why is clearly vital for improving existing programs or designing future ones. Making such assessments requires effective methods of evaluation. Policymakers who use these evaluations require effective methods of evaluation. Policymakers who use these evaluations need to know about the methods--the pitfalls to watch for and the relative advantages and disadvantages of different techniques in different situations. This article describes these evaluation methods and the experience accumulated in the United States in applying them in practice. Copyright 1994 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Grossman, Jean Baldwin, 1994. "Evaluating Social Policies: Principles and U.S. Experience," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 9(2), pages 159-180, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:9:y:1994:i:2:p:159-80
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2000. "Nicaragua : Ex-Post Impact Evaluation of the Emergency Social Investment Fund," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14956, The World Bank.
    2. van de Walle, Dominique, 1998. "Assessing the welfare impacts of public spending," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 365-379, March.
    3. van de Walle, Dominique & Cratty, Dorothyjean, 2005. "Do donors get what they paid for? micro evidence on the fungibility of development project aid," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3542, The World Bank.
    4. Dar, Amit & Gill, Indermit S, 1998. "Evaluating Retraining Programs in OECD Countries: Lessons Learned," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 79-101, February.
    5. Kim, Jooseop, 1998. "Two case studies on impact evaluation of education projects," ISU General Staff Papers 1998010108000012622, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation (EFI), Berlin (ed.), 2013. "Research, innovation and technological performance in Germany - EFI Report 2013," Research, Innovation and Technological Performance in Germany: Report, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin, volume 127, number 2013e, April.
    7. Coleman, Brett E., 1999. "The impact of group lending in Northeast Thailand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 105-141, October.
    8. Alderman, Harold, 2007. "Improving Nutrition through Community Growth Promotion: Longitudinal Study of the Nutrition and Early Child Development Program in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1376-1389, August.
    9. Laura B. Rawlings & Lynne Sherburne-Benz & Julie van Domelen, 2004. "Evaluating Social Funds : A Cross-Country Analysis of Community Investments," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15057.
    10. Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera, 2004. "Teachers’ Salary Structure and Incentives in Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 193, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    11. Lee, Kye Woo, 2016. "Skills Training by Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: Innovative Cases and the Consortium Approach in the Republic of Korea," ADBI Working Papers 579, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    12. Emiliana Vegas & Ilana Umansky, 2005. "Improving Teaching and Learning through Effective Incentives : What Can We Learn from Education Reforms in Latin America?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8694, The World Bank.

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