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The Effect of Metro Expansions on Air Pollution in Delhi

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  • Deepti Goel
  • Sonam Gupta

Abstract

The Delhi Metro (DM) is a mass rapid transit system serving the National Capital Region of India. It is also the world's first rail project to earn carbon credits under the Clean Development Mechanism of the United Nations for reductions in CO2 emissions. We analyze whether the DM led to localized reduction in three transportation source pollutants. Looking at the period 2004–2006, one of the larger rail extensions of the DM led to a 34 percent reduction in localized CO at a major traffic intersection in the city. Results for NO2 are also suggestive of a decline, while those for PM2.5 are inconclusive due to missing data. These impacts of pollutant reductions are for the short run. A complete accounting of all long run costs and benefits should be done before building capital intensive metro rail projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Deepti Goel & Sonam Gupta, 2017. "The Effect of Metro Expansions on Air Pollution in Delhi," The World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 271-294.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:1:p:271-294.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/wber/lhv056
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    Cited by:

    1. Dasgupta,Susmita & Lall,Somik V. & Wheeler,David, 2020. "Traffic, Air Pollution, and Distributional Impacts in Dar es Salaam : A Spatial Analysis with New Satellite Data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9185, The World Bank.
    2. Valeriia Budiakivska & Luca Casolaro, 2018. "Please in my back yard: the private and public benefits of a new tram line in Florence," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1161, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Yanez-Pagans, Patricia & Martinez, Daniel & Mitnik, Oscar A. & Scholl, Lynn & Vazquez, Antonia, 2018. "Urban Transport Systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: Challenges and Lessons Learned," IZA Discussion Papers 11812, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Patricia Yañez-Pagans & Daniel Martinez & Oscar A. Mitnik & Lynn Scholl & Antonia Vazquez, 2019. "Urban transport systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: lessons and challenges," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 28(1), pages 1-25, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Air Pollution; Delhi Metro; Urban Transport;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • R4 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics

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