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Do Behavioral Biases Adversely Affect the Macro-economy?

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  • George M. Korniotis
  • Alok Kumar

Abstract

We investigate whether the adverse effects of investors' behavioral biases extend beyond the domain of financial markets to the broad macro-economy. Focusing on the income risk-sharing role of financial markets, we find that risk sharing is higher (more than double) in U.S. states where investors are more sophisticated and exhibit weaker behavioral biases. The potential for risk sharing varies geographically, but states with better risk-sharing opportunities are able to achieve higher levels of risk sharing only when investors in those states are more sophisticated. Collectively, these results indicate that investors' aggregate behavioral biases and their lack of financial sophistication adversely affect the local macro-economy. The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • George M. Korniotis & Alok Kumar, 2011. "Do Behavioral Biases Adversely Affect the Macro-economy?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(5), pages 1513-1559.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:24:y:2011:i:5:p:1513-1559
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhq110
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    Cited by:

    1. Maiko Koga & Haruko Kato, 2017. "Behavioral Biases in Firms' Growth Expectations," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 17-E-9, Bank of Japan.
    2. Jacobs, Kris & Pallage, St├ęphane & Robe, Michel A., 2013. "Market incompleteness and the equity premium puzzle: Evidence from state-level data," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 378-388.
    3. Peiran Jiao & Amos Nadler, 2016. "The Bull of Wall Street: Experimental Analysis of Testosterone and Asset Trading," Economics Series Working Papers 806, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Individual investor perceptions and behavior during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-74.

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