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The assessment: household saving - issues in theory and policy

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Abstract

In this assessment we discuss the issues raised by the papers in this issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy in the context of economic models of household consumption and saving. We also provide a discussion of what we consider to be some important areas in the current debate surrounding theories and evidence regarding saving behaviour. We highlight the differences that arise from considering partial, as opposed to general, equilibrium models, and in looking at developed, as opposed to developing countries. We also discuss current policy issues relating both to the adequacy of household saving and to the distribution of saving across households, or across asset types, as well as the need for more microdata on saving and asset holding. Copyright 2001, Oxford University Press.

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  • OR Attanasio & J Banks, 2001. "The assessment: household saving - issues in theory and policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 1-19, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:17:y:2001:i:1:p:1-19
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    Cited by:

    1. Patti Fisher & Catherine Montalto, 2011. "Loss Aversion and Saving Behavior: Evidence from the 2007 U.S. Survey of Consumer Finances," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 4-14, March.
    2. Peter Lawrence, 2002. "Household Credit and Saving: Does Policy Matter?," Development and Comp Systems 0211001, EconWPA.
    3. Ricardo Bebczuk & Leonardo Gasparini & Noelia Garbero & Julian Amendolaggine, 2015. "Understanding the Determinants of Household Saving: Micro Evidence for Latin America," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0189, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    4. Rogg, Christian, 2006. "Asset Portfolios in Africa: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," WIDER Working Paper Series 145, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Salotti, Simone, 2010. "An appraisal of the wealth effect in the US: evidence from pseudo-panel data," MPRA Paper 27351, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2010.
    6. Dmitry Kulikov & Karsten Staehr, "undated". "Microeconometric analysis of household saving in Estonia: income, wealth, financial exposure," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2007-8, Bank of Estonia, revised 03 Feb 2015.
    7. K. Mc Morrow & W. Röger, 2002. "EU pension reform - An overview of the debate and an empirical assessment of the main policy reform options," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 162, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    8. Salotti, Simone, 2009. "Wealth effect in the US: evidence from brand new micro-data," MPRA Paper 17732, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Patti Fisher, 2013. "Is There Evidence of Loss Aversion in Saving Behaviors in Spain?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 41-51, March.
    10. Simone Salotti, 2012. "Wealth Effects in the US: Evidence from the Combination of Two Surveys," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(1), pages 67-98.
    11. Brigitte Granville & Sushanta Mallick, 2004. "Pension reforms and saving gains in the United Kingdom," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 123-136.
    12. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, 2006. "Financial expectations, consumption and saving: a microeconomic analysis," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 27(3), pages 313-338, August.
    13. John K Gibson & Grant M Scobie, 2001. "Household Saving Behaviour in New Zealand: A Cohort Analysis," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/18, New Zealand Treasury.

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