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Household Credit and Saving:Does Policy Matter?


  • Peter Lawrence

    () (Keele University, Department of Economics)


This paper surveys the existing literature on the determinants of household savings and credit in developing countries and examines the ways in which macro-level policies might impact on household financial behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Lawrence, 2002. "Household Credit and Saving:Does Policy Matter?," Keele Economics Research Papers KERP 2002/04, Centre for Economic Research, Keele University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kee:kerpuk:2002/04 Note: I am grateful to Gauthier Lanot, Peter Quartey and Tim Worrall for very helpful comments. This paper is an output of Research Project R7968: ‘The Effects of Macro-financial policy on Household Micro-financial Behaviour’ funded by the UK Department for International Development. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author alone

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
    2. Basu, Kaushik, 1983. "The Emergence of Isolation and Interlinkage in Rural Markets," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 262-280, July.
    3. Alessie, Rob & Devereux, Michael P. & Weber, Guglielmo, 1997. "Intertemporal consumption, durables and liquidity constraints: A cohort analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 37-59, January.
    4. OR Attanasio & J Banks, 2001. "The assessment: household saving - issues in theory and policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 1-19, Spring.
    5. Basu, Santonu, 1997. "Why institutional credit agencies are reluctant to lend to the rural poor: A theoretical analysis of the Indian rural credit market," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 267-280, February.
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    More about this item


    Credit; savings; monetary and financial policy transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development


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