IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/oxecpp/v53y2001i1p20-46.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Jobs for the Skilled: How Technology, Trade, and Domestic Demand Changed the Structure of UK Employment, 1979-90

Author

Listed:
  • Gregory, Mary
  • Zissimos, Ben
  • Greenhalgh, Christine

Abstract

A new method is developed for allocating the changing use of skills among final demand growth, trade and technological change. In a multi-sector framework the skills content of intermediate and capital goods purchased is captured through input-output data. Technological change is measured through the changing use of labour, within the sector and in its purchased inputs. Three skill levels are identified from detailed occupations. Domestic demand growth (employment-creating) and technological change (labour-saving) both show marked skill-bias. The effects of trade are small. Most strikingly, the services sector generates high-skilled even more than low-skilled jobs, and new employment through supply chains. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory, Mary & Zissimos, Ben & Greenhalgh, Christine, 2001. "Jobs for the Skilled: How Technology, Trade, and Domestic Demand Changed the Structure of UK Employment, 1979-90," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 20-46, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:53:y:2001:i:1:p:20-46
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Francis Green & Nicholas Tsitsianis, 2004. "Can the Changing Nature of Jobs Account for National Trends in Job Satisfaction?," Studies in Economics 0406, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    2. Neil Foster-McGregor & Robert Stehrer & Gaaitzen Vries, 2013. "Offshoring and the skill structure of labour demand," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(4), pages 631-662, December.
    3. Carsten Ochsen, 2006. "Zukunft der Arbeit und Arbeit der Zukunft in Deutschland," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(2), pages 173-193, May.
    4. Wilfred J. Ethier & Arye L. Hillman, 2017. "The Politics of International Trade," CESifo Working Paper Series 6456, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Castilho, Marta Reis, 2005. "Regional integration and the labour market: the Brazilian case," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    6. Guncavdi Oner & Kucukcifci Suat, 2005. "Financial Reforms and the Decomposition of Economic Growth: An Investigation of the Changing Role of the Financial Sector in Turkey," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 61-84, April.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:53:y:2001:i:1:p:20-46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/oep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.