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Portfolio Diversification Effects of Downside Risk


  • Namwon Hyung


Risk managers use portfolios to diversify away the unpriced risk of individual securities. In this article we compare the benefits of portfolio diversification for downside risk in case returns are normally distributed with the case of fat-tailed distributed returns. The downside risk of a security is decomposed into a part which is attributable to the market risk, an idiosyncratic part, and a second independent factor. We show that the fat-tailed-based downside risk, measured as value-at-risk (VaR), should decline more rapidly than the normal-based VaR. This result is confirmed empirically. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Namwon Hyung, 2005. "Portfolio Diversification Effects of Downside Risk," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 3(1), pages 107-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jfinec:v:3:y:2005:i:1:p:107-125

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chen Zou, 2009. "Dependence structure of risk factors and diversification effects," DNB Working Papers 219, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Antonio Di Cesare & Philip A. Stork & Casper G. de Vries, 2015. "Risk Measures for Autocorrelated Hedge Fund Returns," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 13(4), pages 868-895.
    3. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengfei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The cross-section of tail risks in stock returns," MPRA Paper 45592, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tavakoli Baghdadabad, Mohammad Reza, 2014. "Average drawdown risk reduction and risk tolerances," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 264-276.
    5. Moore, Kyle & Sun, Pengei & de Vries, Casper G. & Zhou, Chen, 2013. "The drivers of downside equity tail risk," MPRA Paper 45591, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Zhou, Chen, 2010. "Dependence structure of risk factors and diversification effects," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 531-540, June.
    7. repec:pal:assmgt:v:18:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1057_s41260-017-0047-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Simon Xu & Inchang Hwang & Francis In, 2016. "The Effect of Diversification on Tail Risk: Evidence from US Equity Mutual Fund Portfolios," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 483-495, September.
    9. DiTraglia, Francis J. & Gerlach, Jeffrey R., 2013. "Portfolio selection: An extreme value approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 305-323.
    10. Namwon Hyung & Casper G. de Vries, 2010. "The Downside Risk of Heavy Tails induces Low Diversification," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-082/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Fang, Yiwei & van Lelyveld, Iman, 2014. "Geographic diversification in banking," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 172-181.
    12. Tee, Kai-Hong, 2009. "The effect of downside risk reduction on UK equity portfolios included with Managed Futures Funds," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 303-310, December.

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