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Sub-Saharan Growth Surprises: Being Heterogeneous, Inland and Close to the Equator Does not Slow Growth Within Africa-super- †

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  • Matthias M. Cinyabuguma
  • Louis Putterman

Abstract

We use two types of cross-country growth regression models to revisit explanations of slow growth in Africa looking at growth rate variation among African countries only. Both sets of models produce results that are surprising given conclusions based on global sample: within Africa, we find a greater coastal population negatively and greater ethnic heterogeneity positively associated with growth, while distance from the equator is at first negatively and only later positively associated with growth. Our results suggest also that institutional and policy variables are endogenous to geographical and historical factors including the colonising power and the religious and ethnic make-up of the country. Copyright 2011 The author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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  • Matthias M. Cinyabuguma & Louis Putterman, 2011. "Sub-Saharan Growth Surprises: Being Heterogeneous, Inland and Close to the Equator Does not Slow Growth Within Africa-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(2), pages 217-262, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:20:y:2011:i:2:p:217-262
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejq040
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexandre Repkine, 2014. "Ethnic Diversity, Political Stability and Productive Efficiency: Empirical Evidence from the African Countries," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(3), pages 315-333, September.
    2. Oana Borcan & Ola Olsson & Louis Putterman, 2018. "State history and economic development: evidence from six millennia," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 1-40, March.
    3. Dev, Pritha & Mberu, Blessing & Pongou, Roland, 2013. "Communitarianism, Oppositional Cultures, and Human Capital Contagion: Theory and Evidence from Formal versus Koranic Education," MPRA Paper 46234, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Apr 2013.
    4. Matthias Kalkuhl & Lukas Kornher & Matthias Kalkuhl & Irfan Mujahid, 2015. "Food price volatility in developing countries – the role of trade and storage," EcoMod2015 8415, EcoMod.

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