IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/erevae/v23y1996i3p281-300.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Changing Tastes and Endogenous Preferences: Some Issues in Modelling the Demand for Agricultural Products

Author

Listed:
  • Young, David

Abstract

Changing patterns of demand for agricultural products have prompted agricultural economists to consider the causes of such changes. However, the standard theory of consumer behaviour which forms the basis of their analyses is arguably ill-designed to deal with such issues. It is argued that there are some fundamental deficiencies with the conventional approach to consumer behaviour. Many of these arise from the reliance upon a particular conception (or construct) of the individual within mainstream theory, which is open to severe criticism from social theory/philosophy. Some illustrations of these problems, which are encountered when attempting to explain changes in preferences, are discussed and the importance of alternative approaches is suggested. The implications for modelling changes in demand are indicated and it is suggested that agricultural economists should either limit the types of questions which they ask or give serious consideration to alternative approaches. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Young, David, 1996. "Changing Tastes and Endogenous Preferences: Some Issues in Modelling the Demand for Agricultural Products," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 281-300.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:23:y:1996:i:3:p:281-300
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. D. P. T. Young, 2000. "Firms' Market Power, Endogenous Preferences and the Focus of Competition Policy," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 73-87.
    2. O'Hara, Sabine U. & Stagl, Sigrid, 2002. "Endogenous preferences and sustainable development," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 511-527.
    3. Benjamin Volland, 2013. "On the intergenerational transmission of preferences," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 217-249, October.
    4. Sigrid Stagl, 2002. "Local Organic Food Markets: Potentials and Limitations for Contributing to Sustainable Development," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 145-162, June.
    5. Stefan Mann, 2006. "Merit goods in a utilitarian framework," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 509-520.
    6. Tisdell, Clem & Wilson, Clevo & Swarna Nantha, Hemanath, 2008. "Contingent valuation as a dynamic process," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1443-1458, August.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:23:y:1996:i:3:p:281-300. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.