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Science and the University: Challenges for Future Research

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  • Paula E. Stephan

Abstract

Scientific research has played a critical role in the life of the university for a considerable period of time, both in Europe and in the US. While much remains the same in the relationship between science and the university, considerable change has occurred in recent years. Here we outline three changes in this relationship, focusing both on the consequences for the university and on questions of research interest to those interested in higher education. The three changes are: (i) increased incentives to publish; (ii) changes in the reward system and (iii) increased reliance by governments and communities on universities and institutes as a source of economic growth. (JEL codes: I23) Copyright , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula E. Stephan, 2008. "Science and the University: Challenges for Future Research," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 54(2), pages 313-324, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cesifo:v:54:y:2008:i:2:p:313-324
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cesifo/ifn014
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    1. repec:spr:scient:v:88:y:2011:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-011-0371-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Franceschini, Fiorenzo & Maisano, Domenico, 2011. "Regularity in the research output of individual scientists: An empirical analysis by recent bibliometric tools," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 458-468.
    3. Victoria Galán-Muros & Peter Sijde & Peter Groenewegen & Thomas Baaken, 2017. "Nurture over nature: How do European universities support their collaboration with business?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 184-205, February.
    4. Larsen, Maria Theresa, 2011. "The implications of academic enterprise for public science: An overview of the empirical evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 6-19, February.
    5. Huang, Kenneth G. & Murray, Fiona E., 2010. "Entrepreneurial experiments in science policy: Analyzing the Human Genome Project," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 567-582, June.
    6. Stoetzer, Matthias-Wolfgang & Osborn, Evan, 2014. "Does gender really matter? An analysis of Jena University scientists collaboration with industry and non-profit-partners," Jena Contributions to Economic Research 2014/2, University of Applied Sciences Jena, Department of Business Administration.
    7. Julien Pénin, 2008. "More open than open innovation? Rethinking the concept of openness in innovation studies," Working Papers of BETA 2008-18, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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