IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/ajagec/v93y2011i4p1151-1167.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Productivity of Nanobiotechnology Research and Education in U.S. Universities

Author

Listed:
  • William L. Weber
  • Yin Xia

Abstract

The knowledge production process of thirty universities that participated in nanobiotechnology research during 1990--2005 is estimated by a stochastic directional technology distance function. Knowledge outputs include journal articles, patents, and Ph.D students. The dual elasticity of transformation between knowledge outputs is estimated. An increase in patents reduces the revenue shares of publications and Ph.D students for a majority of the thirty universities. Aggregate university inefficiency has a U shape with a minimum in 1997. Evidence of technological regress is found which indicates that the increased production of patents, publications, and Ph.D students is due to bigger research budgets. Copyright 2011, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • William L. Weber & Yin Xia, 2011. "The Productivity of Nanobiotechnology Research and Education in U.S. Universities," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1151-1167.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:93:y:2011:i:4:p:1151-1167
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ajae/aar032
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yaisawarng, Suthathip & Ng, Ying Chu, 2014. "The impact of higher education reform on research performance of Chinese universities," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 94-105.
    2. Badau, Flavius & Färe, Rolf & Gopinath, Munisamy, 2016. "Global resilience to climate change: Examining global economic and environmental performance resulting from a global carbon dioxide market," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 46-64.
    3. Silva, Felipe & Fulginiti, Lilyan E. & Perrin, Richard K., 2016. "Did technical change in agricultural production decrease the emission of pollutants on the Amazon Forest during 1990-2009?," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230092, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Pedro Macedo & Elvira Silva, 2017. "Sensitivity of directional technical inefficiency measures to the choice of the direction vector: a simulation study," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 52-62.
    5. Fukuyama, Hirofumi & Weber, William L. & Xia, Yin, 2016. "Time substitution and network effects with an application to nanobiotechnology policy for US universities," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 34-44.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:93:y:2011:i:4:p:1151-1167. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.