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Responsiveness, Flexibility, and Market Liberalization in China's Agriculture

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  • Jikun Huang

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  • Jikun Huang, 2000. "Responsiveness, Flexibility, and Market Liberalization in China's Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1133-1139.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:82:y:2000:i:5:p:1133-1139
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/0002-9092.00111
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    9. Martin Ravallion & Emanuela Galasso & Teodoro Lazo & Ernesto Philipp, 2005. "What Can Ex-Participants Reveal about a Program’s Impact?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
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    Cited by:

    1. Mullen, John D., 2004. "Impact Assessment of ACIAR-funded Projects on Grain-market Reform in China," Impact Assessment Series (IAS) 113252, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research.
    2. Michael Kopsidis & Katja Bruisch & Daniel W. Bromley, 2013. "Where is the Backward Peasant? Regional Crop Yields on Common and Private Land in Russia 1883-1913," Working Papers 0046, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Tong, Haizhi, 2002. "Chinese Regional Agricultural Productivity In The 1990'S," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19804, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Yang, Weiyong, 2009. "Economic structural changes and rural income: Evidence from Chinese provinces during the reform period," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 742-753, December.
    5. Hoang, Trung X. & Pham, Cong S. & Ulubaşoğlu, Mehmet A., 2014. "Non-Farm Activity, Household Expenditure, and Poverty Reduction in Rural Vietnam: 2002–2008," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 554-568.
    6. Jin, Songqing & Deininger, Klaus, 2009. "Land rental markets in the process of rural structural transformation: Productivity and equity impacts from China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 629-646, December.
    7. J. D. Mullen, 2005. "Domestic grain market reform in china: the contribution of economic policy research funded by ACIAR," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 75-94.
    8. Linda Yueh, 2010. "The Economy of China," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3705, April.
    9. Wang, Xiaobing, 2007. "Labor market behavior of Chinese rural households during transition," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 42, number 92321, December.
    10. Haizhi Tong & Lilyan E. Fulginiti, 2005. "Chinese Regional Agricultural Productivity in the 1990'a," Others 0502012, EconWPA.
    11. Reardon, Thomas & Barrett, Christopher B. & Berdegué, Julio A. & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2009. "Agrifood Industry Transformation and Small Farmers in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1717-1727, November.
    12. Nin Pratt, Alejandro & Hertel, Thomas W. & Foster, Kenneth A. & Rae, Allan N., 2001. "Productivity Growth And Catching-Up: Implications For China'S Trade In Livestock Products," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20590, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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