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Systemic Risk Monitor: A Model for Systemic Risk Analysis and Stress Testing of Banking Systems


  • Michael Boss

    () (Oesterreichische Nationalbank)

  • Gerald Krenn

    () (Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Financial Markets Analysis and Surveillance Division)

  • Claus Puhr

    () (Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Financial Markets Analysis and Surveillance Division)

  • Martin Summer

    () (Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Economic Studies Division)


In 2002 the Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB) launched in parallel several projects to develop modern tools for systemic financial stability analysis, off-site banking supervision and supervisory data analysis. In these projects the OeNB’s expertise in financial analysis and research was combined with expertise from the Austrian Financial Market Authority (FMA) and from academia. Systemic Risk Monitor (SRM) is part of this effort. SRM is a model to analyze banking supervision data and data from the Major Loans Register collected at the OeNB in an integrated quantitative risk management framework to assess systemic risk in the Austrian banking system at a quarterly frequency. SRM is also used to perform regular stress testing exercises. This paper gives an overview of the general ideas used by SRM and shows some of its applications to a recent Austrian dataset.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Boss & Gerald Krenn & Claus Puhr & Martin Summer, 2006. "Systemic Risk Monitor: A Model for Systemic Risk Analysis and Stress Testing of Banking Systems," Financial Stability Report, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 11, pages 83-95.
  • Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbfs:y:2006:i:11:b:2

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Using Market Information for Banking System Risk Assessment," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(1), March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claus Puhr & Reinhardt Seliger & Michael Sigmund, 2012. "Contagiousness and Vulnerability in the Austrian Interbank Market," Financial Stability Report, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 24, pages 62-78.
    2. Eugenio Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Patrick McGuire, 2012. "Systemic Risks in Global Banking: What Available Data Can Tell Us and What More Data Are Needed?," NBER Chapters,in: Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling, pages 235-260 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sreejata Banerjee & Divya Murali, 2015. "Stress Test of Banks in India: A VAR Approach," Working Papers 2015-102, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    4. Henry, Jérôme & Kok, Christoffer & Amzallag, Adrien & Baudino, Patrizia & Cabral, Inês & Grodzicki, Maciej & Gross, Marco & Halaj, Grzegorz & Kolb, Markus & Leber, Miha & Pancaro, Cosimo & Sydow, Matt, 2013. "A macro stress testing framework for assessing systemic risks in the banking sector," Occasional Paper Series 152, European Central Bank.
    5. Rodolfo Maino & Kalin I Tintchev, 2012. "From Stress to Costress; Stress Testing Interconnected Banking Systems," IMF Working Papers 12/53, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Tente, Natalia & von Westernhagen, Natalja & Slopek, Ulf, 2017. "M-PRESS-CreditRisk: A holistic micro- and macroprudential approach to capital requirements," Discussion Papers 15/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    7. Casu, Barbara & Clare, Andrew & Saleh, Nashwa, 2011. "Towards a new model for early warning signals for systemic financial fragility and near crises: an application to OECD countries," MPRA Paper 37043, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Francisco Nadal De Simone & Franco Stragiotti, 2010. "Market and Funding Liquidity Stress Testing of the Luxembourg Banking Sector," BCL working papers 45, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    9. Jan Willem van den End, 2010. "Liquidity Stress-Tester: A Model for Stress-testing Banks' Liquidity Risk," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 56(1), pages 38-69, March.
    10. Härdle, Wolfgang Karl & Wang, Weining & Yu, Lining, 2016. "TENET: Tail-Event driven NETwork risk," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 192(2), pages 499-513.
    11. Christian Schmieder & Maher Hasan & Claus Puhr, 2011. "Next Generation Balance Sheet Stress Testing," IMF Working Papers 11/83, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Francesco Grigoli & Mario Mansilla & Martín Saldías, 2016. "Macro-Financial Linkages and Heterogeneous Non-Performing Loans Projections; An Application to Ecuador," IMF Working Papers 16/236, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Zuzana Fungacova & Petr Jakubik, 2013. "Bank Stress Tests as an Information Device for Emerging Markets: The Case of Russia," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(1), pages 87-105, March.
    14. Puzanova, Natalia & Düllmann, Klaus, 2013. "Systemic risk contributions: A credit portfolio approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1243-1257.
    15. Antonella Foglia, 2009. "Stress Testing Credit Risk: A Survey of Authorities' Aproaches," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 5(3), pages 9-45, September.
    16. Wald Nowotny, 2013. "The Economics of Financial Regulation," Chapters,in: Stability of the Financial System, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Goodhart, C.A.E., 2006. "A framework for assessing financial stability?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 3415-3422, December.
    18. Petr Jakubik & Christian Schmieder, 2008. "Stress Testing Credit Risk: Is the Czech Republic Different from Germany?," Working Papers 2008/9, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    19. Stijn Ferrari & Patrick Van Roy & Cristina Vespro, 2011. "Stress testing credit risk: modelling issues," Financial Stability Review, National Bank of Belgium, vol. 9(1), pages 105-120, June.
    20. Darne, O. & Levy-Rueff, O. & Pop, A., 2013. "Calibrating Initial Shocks in Bank Stress Test Scenarios: An Outlier Detection Based Approach," Working papers 426, Banque de France.
    21. Sarlin, Peter, 2014. "Macroprudential oversight, risk communication and visualization," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 61217, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    22. International Monetary Fund, 2014. "Austria; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation—Technical Note on Stress Testing the Banking Sector," IMF Staff Country Reports 14/16, International Monetary Fund.
    23. Martínez-Jaramillo, Serafín & Pérez, Omar Pérez & Embriz, Fernando Avila & Dey, Fabrizio López Gallo, 2010. "Systemic risk, financial contagion and financial fragility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 2358-2374, November.
    24. Eric Wong & Cho-Hoi Hui, 2009. "A Liquidity Risk Stress-Testing Framework with Interaction between Market and Credit Risks," Working Papers 0906, Hong Kong Monetary Authority.

    More about this item


    Stress Testing; Banks; Financial Stability;

    JEL classification:

    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage


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