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Recent Evidence on Taxpayers' Response to the Rate Increases in the 1990s

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  • Sammartino, Frank
  • Weiner, David

Abstract

Tabulates cross-sectional and panel data on changes in reported incomes for the period 1989-1995. Shows that reported income for high-income taxpayers (especially wages and salaries) fell from 1992 to 1993 following the 1993 tax increase. By 1995, however, the decline for the highest income group was recouped. Suggests that across time comparisons, like those made here and previously for TRA 86, will not yield a stable relationship between marginal rates and reported incomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Sammartino, Frank & Weiner, David, 1997. "Recent Evidence on Taxpayers' Response to the Rate Increases in the 1990s," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 50(3), pages 683-705, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:50:y:1997:i:3:p:683-705
    DOI: 10.1086/NTJ41789288
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Feldstein, Martin, 1995. "The Effect of Marginal Tax Rates on Taxable Income: A Panel Study of the 1986 Tax Reform Act," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 551-572, June.
    2. Feldstein, Martin, 1995. "The Effect of Marginal Tax Rates on Taxable Income: A Panel Study of the 1986 Tax Reform Act," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 551-572, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claus Thustrup Kreiner & Søren Leth-Petersen & Peer Ebbesen Skov, 2016. "Tax Reforms and Intertemporal Shifting of Wage Income: Evidence from Danish Monthly Payroll Records," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(3), pages 233-257, August.
    2. Austan Goolsbee, 2000. "What Happens When You Tax the Rich? Evidence from Executive Compensation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(2), pages 352-378, April.
    3. Holmlund Bertil & Söderström Martin, 2011. "Estimating Dynamic Income Responses to Tax Reform," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-38, November.
    4. Soren Blomquist & Anil Kumar & Che-Yuan Liang & Whitney K. Newey, 2014. "Individual heterogeneity, nonlinear budget sets, and taxable income," CeMMAP working papers CWP21/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Carina Neisser, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," Working Papers 2017/10, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    6. Seth H. Giertz, 2006. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income During the 1990s: A Sensitivity Analysis: Working Paper 2006-03," Working Papers 17611, Congressional Budget Office.
    7. Saez, Emmanuel, 2003. "The effect of marginal tax rates on income: a panel study of 'bracket creep'," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 1231-1258, May.
    8. Gruber, Jon & Saez, Emmanuel, 2002. "The elasticity of taxable income: evidence and implications," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-32, April.
    9. Karel Mertens & José Luis Montiel Olea, 2018. "Marginal Tax Rates and Income: New Time Series Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 133(4), pages 1803-1884.
    10. Austan Goolsbee, 1999. "Evidence on the High-Income Laffer Curve from Six Decades of Tax Reform," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 30(2), pages 1-64.
    11. Benjamin Russo, 2009. "Innovation and the Long‐Run Elasticity of Total Taxable Income," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 75(3), pages 798-828, January.
    12. Aspen Gorry & Glenn Hubbard & Aparna Mathur, 2021. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income in The Presence of Intertemporal Income Shifting," National Tax Journal, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74(1), pages 45-73.
    13. Lang (Kate) Yang & Bradley T. Heim, 2017. "Responsiveness of Income to Local Income Taxes: Evidence from Indiana," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 70(2), pages 367-392, June.
    14. Eleni A. Kaditi & Elisavet I. Nitsi, 2013. "Recent Evidence on the Taxpayers’ Reporting Decision in Greece: A Quantile Regression Approach," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(2), pages 3-24.
    15. James Browne & David Phillips, 2017. "Estimating the size and nature of responses to changes in income tax rates on top incomes in the UK: a panel analysis," IFS Working Papers W17/13, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    16. Holmlund, Bertil & Söderström, Martin, 2008. "Estimating dynamic income responses to tax reforms: Swedish evidence," Working Paper Series 2008:28, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    17. Emmanuel Saez & Joel Slemrod & Seth H. Giertz, 2012. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income with Respect to Marginal Tax Rates: A Critical Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(1), pages 3-50, March.
    18. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Tore Olsen & Luigi Pistaferri, 2011. "Adjustment Costs, Firm Responses, and Micro vs. Macro Labor Supply Elasticities: Evidence from Danish Tax Records," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(2), pages 749-804.
    19. Emmanuel Saez, 2004. "Reported Incomes and Marginal Tax Rates, 1960–2000: Evidence and Policy Implications," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 18, pages 117-174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Seth H. Giertz, 2008. "Panel Data Techniques and the Elasticity of Taxable Income: Working Paper 2008-11," Working Papers 20407, Congressional Budget Office.

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