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Fertility Growth Potential in Russia: Lessons of the Megalopolis

Author

Listed:
  • Maleva, T.

    (Institute of social analysis and forecasting of the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Moscow, Russia)

  • Tyndik, A.

    (Institute of social analysis and forecasting of the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Moscow, Russia)

Abstract

Article focuses on fertility and reproductive behavior of the Moscow population. Current statistical fertility indicators in Moscow and in Russia as a whole are comprised. Male and female reproductive attitudes in Moscow are analyzed based on a sample survey. The article address issues of the impact of contemporary demographic policies on reproductive behavior of the population, it also contains the recommendations for its improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Maleva, T. & Tyndik, A., 2013. "Fertility Growth Potential in Russia: Lessons of the Megalopolis," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 137-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:nea:journl:y:2013:i:17:p:137-158
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tomas Frejka & Sergei Zakharov, 2012. "Comprehensive analyses of fertility trends in the Russian Federation during the past half century," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; fertility attitudes; sample survey;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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