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Delinquency, Social Institutions, and Capital Accumulation


  • Ambrose Leung


This paper models the link between teenage delinquency rates and underlying measures of human and social capital and tests its predictions on a large Montreal database. The model allows teenagers to choose among a number of competing time uses, and the empirical work uses binary and ordered choice models to test the theoretical predictions of the effects of participation in various social institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambrose Leung, 2002. "Delinquency, Social Institutions, and Capital Accumulation," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 158(3), pages 420-420, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(200209)158:3_420:dsiaca_2.0.tx_2-s

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grossman, Herschel I & Kim, Minseong, 1995. "Swords or Plowshares? A Theory of the Security of Claims to Property," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1275-1288, December.
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:79:y:1985:i:04:p:943-957_23 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Ambrose Leung & Cheryl Kier & Tak Fung & Linda Fung & Robert Sproule, 2011. "Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capital," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 443-462, June.
    2. Leung, Ambrose & Woolley, Frances & Tremblay, Richard E. & Vitaro, Frank, 2005. "Who gets caught?: Statistical discrimination in law enforcement," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 289-309, May.
    3. Leung, Ambrose & Ferris, J. Stephen, 2008. "School size and youth violence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 318-333, February.
    4. Lindvall, Lars, 2003. "Does Public Spending on Youths Affect Crime Rates?," Working Paper Series 2004:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply


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