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The Effectiveness of South Africa’s Immigration Policy for Addressing Skills Shortages

Author

Listed:
  • Fatima Rasool

    (Management College of South Africa, Republic of South Africa)

  • Christoff Botha

    (North West University, Republic of South Africa)

  • Christo Bisschoff

    (North West University, Republic of South Africa)

Abstract

South Africa is presently experiencing a serious shortage of skilled workers. This situation is negatively influencing the economic prospects and global participation of the country. The primary purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of sa’s immigration policy to support skills immigration. The outcome of this study indicated that South Africa’s immigration policy is restrictive and has undoubtedly influenced the shortage of skills in the country. This study has confirmed the findings of similar studies undertaken by the Centre for Development and Enterprise that South Africa’s skills immigration policy is very restrictive and is thus not helpful in addressing the skills shortages of the country

Suggested Citation

  • Fatima Rasool & Christoff Botha & Christo Bisschoff, 2012. "The Effectiveness of South Africa’s Immigration Policy for Addressing Skills Shortages," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 10(4 (Winter), pages 399-418.
  • Handle: RePEc:mgt:youmgt:v:10:y:2012:i:4:p:399-418
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexandra Doyle & Amos C Peters & Asha Sundaram, 2014. "Skills mismatch and informal sector participation among educated immigrants: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 137, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Jonathan Crush, 2014. "Southern hub: the globalization of migration to South Africa," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 8, pages 211-240 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    emigration; immigration; brain drain; push and pull factors; migration; globalisation;

    JEL classification:

    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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