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Religion and the Demand for Membership in Environmental Citizen Groups

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  • Lowry, Robert C

Abstract

The author tests the hypothesis that religious affiliation is an empirical measure of tastes and beliefs that affect the demand for membership in environmental citizen groups. The number of adherents to Judeo-Christian denominations per household has a significant, negative effect on state membership rates for nine groups advocating a preservationist approach to environmental policy, particularly in states with many Catholics, Baptists, and Mormons. Religious affiliation has a marginally significant, positive effect on membership rates for two sportsmen groups advocating private stewardship. These results suggest that religious affiliation should also be a significant determinant of constituent preferences for environmental policies. Copyright 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Lowry, Robert C, 1998. "Religion and the Demand for Membership in Environmental Citizen Groups," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 94(3-4), pages 223-240, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:94:y:1998:i:3-4:p:223-40
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    Cited by:

    1. Owen, Ann L. & Videras, Julio R., 2007. "Culture and public goods: The case of religion and the voluntary provision of environmental quality," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 162-180, September.
    2. Clifford A. Grammich, 2005. "Many Faiths of Many Regions Continuities and Changes Among Religious Adherents Across U.S. Counties," Working Papers WR-211, RAND Corporation.
    3. Videras, Julio, 2006. "Religion and animal welfare: Evidence from voting data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 652-659, August.
    4. Chermak, Janie M. & Krause, Kate, 2002. "Individual Response, Information, and Intergenerational Common Pool Problems," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 47-70, January.
    5. van Kempen, Luuk & Muradian, Roldan & Sandóval, César & Castañeda, Juan-Pablo, 2009. "Too poor to be green consumers? A field experiment on revealed preferences for firewood in rural Guatemala," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 2160-2167, May.

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