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Should Cultural Goods Be Treated Differently?


  • Andreu Mas-Colell


This article considers the specificity of cultural goods, services, and artifacts in the context of international trade theory. The analysis discusses possible justifications for import or export restrictions on cultural goods. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Suggested Citation

  • Andreu Mas-Colell, 1999. "Should Cultural Goods Be Treated Differently?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 23(1), pages 87-93, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:23:y:1999:i:1:p:87-93
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1007527801113

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grossman, Sanford J & Hart, Oliver D, 1986. "The Costs and Benefits of Ownership: A Theory of Vertical and Lateral Integration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 691-719, August.
    2. Krugman, Paul R, 1987. "Is Free Trade Passe?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 131-144, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Richardson & Simon Wilkie, 2013. "Faddists, enthusiasts and Canadian divas:a model of the recorded music market," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2013-600, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    2. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 2009. "Neckties in the tropics: a model of international trade and cultural diversity," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 809-843, August.
    3. Disdier, Anne-Célia & Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2010. "Exposure to foreign media and changes in cultural traits: Evidence from naming patterns in France," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 226-238, March.
    4. Darlene Chisholm & Víctor Fernández-Blanco & S. Abraham Ravid & W. David Walls, 2015. "Economics of motion pictures: the state of the art," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(1), pages 1-13, February.
    5. Jingchen Jiang & Yanqing Jiang, 2015. "An analysis of the trade barriers to the Chinese cultural trade," Journal of Asian Business Strategy, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(4), pages 62-72, April.
    6. Martin Richardson & Simon Wilkie, 2015. "Faddists, Enthusiasts and Canadian Divas: Broadcasting Quotas and the Supply Response," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(2), pages 404-424, May.
    7. JINJI Naoto & TANAKA Ayumu, 2015. "How Does UNESCO's Convention on Cultural Diversity Affect Trade in Cultural Goods?," Discussion papers 15126, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).


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