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Why Firms Should Not Always Maximize Profits

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  • Ivar Kolstad

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ivar Kolstad, 2007. "Why Firms Should Not Always Maximize Profits," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 76(2), pages 137-145, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:76:y:2007:i:2:p:137-145
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-006-9262-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10551-006-9262-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Catherine M. Paul & Donald Siegel, 2006. "Corporate social responsibility and economic performance," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 207-211, December.
    2. Elsayed, Khaled & Paton, David, 2005. "The impact of environmental performance on firm performance: static and dynamic panel data evidence," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 395-412, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Teraji, Shinji, 2009. "A model of corporate social performance: Social satisfaction and moral conduct," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 926-934, December.
    2. Lori Holder-Webb & Jeffrey Cohen & Leda Nath & David Wood, 2009. "The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 84(4), pages 497-527, February.
    3. Kais Bouslah & Bouchra M’Zali & Marie-France Turcotte & Maher Kooli, 2010. "The Impact of Forest Certification on Firm Financial Performance in Canada and the U.S," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 96(4), pages 551-572, November.
    4. Li-Jen He & Hsiangtsai Chiang & Cang-Fu Shiao, 2015. "Financial Reports Quality and Corporate Social Responsibility," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(3), pages 453-467, March.
    5. Geoffrey Bell & Bruno Dyck, 2011. "Conventional Resource-Based Theory and its Radical Alternative: A Less Materialist-Individualist Approach to Strategy," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 121-130, February.
    6. Lloyd, Bob, 2007. "The Commons revisited: The tragedy continues," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5806-5818, November.
    7. Martin, Patrick R. & Moser, Donald V., 2016. "Managers’ green investment disclosures and investors’ reaction," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 239-254.
    8. Yongtae Kim & Meir Statman, 2012. "Do Corporations Invest Enough in Environmental Responsibility?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 105(1), pages 115-129, January.
    9. Pamela Queen, 2015. "Enlightened Shareholder Maximization: Is this Strategy Achievable?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 683-694, March.
    10. Wiig, Arne & Kolstad, Ivar, 2010. "Multinational corporations and host country institutions: A case study of CSR activities in Angola," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 178-190, April.
    11. Christof Miska & Christian Hilbe & Susanne Mayer, 2014. "Reconciling Different Views on Responsible Leadership: A Rationality-Based Approach," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 125(2), pages 349-360, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    business ethics; corporate social responsibility (CSR); profit maximization; special duties; D63; M14;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

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