IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jbuset/v111y2012i2p165-178.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Behavioral Integrity: How Leader Referents and Trust Matter to Workplace Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Rangapriya Kannan-Narasimhan

    ()

  • Barbara Lawrence

    ()

Abstract

Behavioral integrity (BI) is the alignment pattern between an actor’s words and deeds as perceived by another person. Employees’ perception that their leader’s actions and words are consistent leads to desirable workplace outcomes. Although BI is a powerful concept, the role of leader referents, the relationship between perceived BI of different referents, and the process by which BI affects outcomes are unclear. Our purpose is to elaborate upon this process and clarify the role of different leader referents in determining various outcomes. To understand the impact of referents, we explicitly compared the BIs of two leader referents: senior management and supervisor. In contrast to previous research findings where supervisory BI was found to have a stronger relationship with outcomes than senior management, we find that both referents are important. However, their impact varies based upon the outcome studied. Only senior management BI predicted organizational commitment, while senior management BI, supervisory BI and supervisory trust predicted organizational cynicism. Only trust in supervisor, and not supervisory BI, impacted organizational citizenship behaviors. When senior management is the referent, trust and not BI might play an important role for outcomes that require extensive employee investments, such as organizational commitment. In contrast, when the outcome measured does not require employee investments, BI might have a direct impact on the outcome. We also uncovered that trust in supervisor substantially influences the trust employees have in their senior management. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Rangapriya Kannan-Narasimhan & Barbara Lawrence, 2012. "Behavioral Integrity: How Leader Referents and Trust Matter to Workplace Outcomes," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 111(2), pages 165-178, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:111:y:2012:i:2:p:165-178
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-011-1199-9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10551-011-1199-9
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anne Davis & Hannah Rothstein, 2006. "The Effects of the Perceived Behavioral Integrity of Managers on Employee Attitudes: A Meta-analysis," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 67(4), pages 407-419, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tony Simons & Hannes Leroy & Veroniek Collewaert & Stijn Masschelein, 2015. "How Leader Alignment of Words and Deeds Affects Followers: A Meta-analysis of Behavioral Integrity Research," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 132(4), pages 831-844, December.
    2. repec:kap:jbuset:v:144:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2821-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Martha Andrews & K. Kacmar & Charles Kacmar, 2015. "The Interactive Effects of Behavioral Integrity and Procedural Justice on Employee Job Tension," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 126(3), pages 371-379, February.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:111:y:2012:i:2:p:165-178. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.