IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/enreec/v26y2003i1p107-124.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Demand-Side Technology Standards Under Inefficient Pricing Regimes

Author

Listed:
  • Christopher Timmins

    ()

Abstract

When price-setting regulators haveobjectives other than maximizing socialsurplus, the conservation potential ofdemand-side technology standards can besignificantly diminished. This paperdemonstrates this by empirically recovering thesocially sub-optimal preferences of a group ofwater managers in a groundwater-dependentregion of California and simulating theirinefficient price response to the mandatedadoption of low-flow appliances by homeowners. The resulting reduction in the conservationpotential of these appliances is quantified,and a modest tax is shown to be a relativelycost-effective policy tool for conservation. If non-price conservation policies arepreferred according to equity criteria, thepaper suggests that, in order to preserve theirconservation potential, policy-makers should berequired to continue to set prices as if notechnology standards had been introduced. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Timmins, 2003. "Demand-Side Technology Standards Under Inefficient Pricing Regimes," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(1), pages 107-124, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:26:y:2003:i:1:p:107-124
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1025689706396
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1025689706396
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bauman, Allison & Goemans, Christopher & Pritchett, James & Thilmany McFadden, Dawn, 2015. "Modeling Imperfectly Competitive Water Markets in the Western U.S," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 201448, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Olmstead, Sheila M. & Michael Hanemann, W. & Stavins, Robert N., 2007. "Water demand under alternative price structures," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 181-198, September.
    3. Olmstead, Sheila M. & Stavins, Robert N., 2008. "Comparing Price and Non-price Approaches to Urban Water Conservation," Discussion Papers dp-08-22, Resources For the Future.
    4. Jeffrey A. Edwards & Tara R. Wade & Mark L. Burkey & R. Gary Pumphrey, 2014. "Forecasting the Public's Acceptability of Municipal Water Regulation and Price Rationing for Communities on the Ogallala Aquifer," Journal of Economic Insight (formerly the Journal of Economics (MVEA)), Missouri Valley Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 1-30.
    5. Mansur, Erin T. & Olmstead, Sheila M., 2012. "The value of scarce water: Measuring the inefficiency of municipal regulations," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 332-346.
    6. Castledine, A. & Moeltner, K. & Price, M.K. & Stoddard, S., 2014. "Free to choose: Promoting conservation by relaxing outdoor watering restrictions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PA), pages 324-343.
    7. Christopher Timmins, 2002. "Measuring the Dynamic Efficiency Costs of Regulators' Preferences: Municipal Water Utilities in the Arid West," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(2), pages 603-629, March.
    8. repec:ags:joaaec:163080 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Sajjad Ahmad & Dinesh Prashar, 2010. "Evaluating Municipal Water Conservation Policies Using a Dynamic Simulation Model," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 24(13), pages 3371-3395, October.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:26:y:2003:i:1:p:107-124. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.