IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ijf/ijfiec/v1y1996i3p197-205.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Capital Controls and Emerging Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Dooley, Michael P

Abstract

Capital inflows to emerging markets in recent years have generated opportunities for economic development and problems for economic management. The exchange market crisis in Mexico and the lingering negative impact on the Mexican economy have led to renewed calls for greater official participation and control of international capital movements. In fact, many developing countries have imposed controls designed to reduce or alter the composition of capital inflows. In this paper we review familiar arguments about capital controls and attempt to evaluate a new distortion that might justify government interventions in international capital markets. The idea is straightforward. Emerging markets inherited distorted domestic credit markets from a model of economic development that placed the state in the centre of financial intermediation. Liberalization of these domestic markets is proceeding but far from complete. During the transition, incentives can emerge that make capital inflows welfare reducing. Free deposit insurance is an obvious distortion. But less obvious chains of implicit insurance can also cause problems. We argue that fixed exchange rates and solvency can be a deadly combination for governments with a history of heavy involvement with domestic financial markets. Copyright @ 1996 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation

  • Dooley, Michael P, 1996. "Capital Controls and Emerging Markets," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(3), pages 197-205, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:1:y:1996:i:3:p:197-205
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jtoc?ID=15416
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Barry Eichengreen., 1998. "International Economic Policy in the Wake of the Asian Crisis," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C98-102, University of California at Berkeley.
    2. Sebastian Edwards, 2000. "Capital Flows, Real Exchange Rates, and Capital Controls: Some Latin American Experiences," NBER Chapters,in: Capital Flows and the Emerging Economies: Theory, Evidence, and Controversies, pages 197-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Eichengreen, Barry, 2000. "Taming Capital Flows," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1105-1116, June.
    4. Dooley, Michael P, 2000. "A Model of Crises in Emerging Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(460), pages 256-272, January.
    5. Islam, Roumeen, 2000. "Should capital flows be regulated? - a look at the issues and policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2293, The World Bank.
    6. Reinhart, Carmen M & Reinhart, Vincent R, 1999. "On the Use of Reserve Requirements in Dealing with Capital Flow Problems," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(1), pages 27-54, January.
    7. Eliana Cardoso & Ilan Goldfajn, 1998. "Capital Flows to Brazil: The Endogeneity of Capital Controls," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(1), pages 161-202, March.
    8. C. Rangarajan & A. Prasad, 2008. "Capital flows, exchange rate management and monetary policy," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 135-149.
    9. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Detragiache, Enrica, 1999. "Monitoring banking sector fragility : a multivariate logit approach with an application to the 1996-97 banking crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2085, The World Bank.
    10. Amira, Khaled & Muzere, Mark L., 2011. "Competition among stock exchanges for equity," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 2355-2373, September.
    11. Malgorzata Sulimierska, 2008. "Capital Account Liberalization and Currency Crisis - The Case of Central Eastern European Countries," International Trade and Finance Association Conference Papers 1140, International Trade and Finance Association.
    12. Sebastian Edwards, 1998. "Capital Inflows into Latin America: A Stop-Go Story?," NBER Working Papers 6441, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Eichengreen, Barry & Bayoumi, Tamim, 1996. "Is Asia an Optimum Currency Area? Can It Become One? Regional, Global and Historical Perspectives on Asian Monetary Relations," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt1td5x343, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    14. Malgorzata Sulimierska, 2008. "The Theoretical Link Between Capital Account Liberalization and Currency Crisis Episodes," International Trade and Finance Association Conference Papers 1111, International Trade and Finance Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijf:ijfiec:v:1:y:1996:i:3:p:197-205. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1076-9307/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.