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Testing for Marginal Changes in Income Distributions with Lorenz and Concentration Curves

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  • Bishop, John A
  • Chow, K Victor
  • Formby, John P

Abstract

Asymptotically distribution free statistical tests for comparing absolute and relative Lorenz and concentration curves are provided. The procedures do not require independent samples and can be used to test for marginal changes in income distributions. The tests are illustrated using a large sample of tax returns that have been randomly selected for audit by the Internal Revenue Service. The tests reveal the marginal effects of systematic underreporting of income and tax liabilities on the U.S. income distribution. Copyright 1994 by Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania and the Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Bishop, John A & Chow, K Victor & Formby, John P, 1994. "Testing for Marginal Changes in Income Distributions with Lorenz and Concentration Curves," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 35(2), pages 479-488, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:35:y:1994:i:2:p:479-88
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. André DECOSTER & Guy VAN CAMP, 2000. "Redistributive Effects of the Shift from Personal Income Taxes to Indirect Taxes: Belgium 1988-1993," Working Papers Department of Economics ces0007, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    2. Luca Crivelli & Paola Salari, 2012. "Fiscal federalism and income redistribution through healthcare financing: An empirical analysis for the Swiss cantons," CEPRA working paper 1204, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    3. Klavus, Jan, 2001. "Statistical inference of progressivity dominance: an application to health care financing distributions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 363-377, May.
    4. Shlomo Yitzhaki & Edna Schechtman, 2004. "The Gini Instrumental Variable, or the “double instrumental variable” estimator," Metron - International Journal of Statistics, Dipartimento di Statistica, Probabilità e Statistiche Applicate - University of Rome, vol. 0(3), pages 287-313.
    5. John A. Bishop & K. Victor Chow & Feijun Luo & Lester A. Zeager, "undated". "Changes in Economic Advantage by National Origin After German Unification," Working Papers 0206, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ben Jann, 2016. "Estimating Lorenz and concentration curves in Stata," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 15, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences, revised 27 Oct 2016.
    7. Abu-Zaineh, Mohammad & Mataria, Awad & Luchini, Stéphane & Moatti, Jean-Paul, 2008. "Equity in health care financing in Palestine: The value-added of the disaggregate approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(11), pages 2308-2320, June.
    8. Cisse, Boubou & Luchini, Stephane & Moatti, Jean Paul, 2007. "Progressivity and horizontal equity in health care finance and delivery: What about Africa?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 51-68, January.
    9. Gabriel M. Leung & Keith Y. K. Tin & Owen O'Donnell, 2009. "Redistribution or horizontal equity in Hong Kong's mixed public-private health system: a policy conundrum," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 37-54.
    10. Sven Neelsen & Owen O’Donnell, 2016. "Progressive Universalism? The Impact of Targeted Coverage on Healthcare Access and Expenditures in Peru," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-019/V, Tinbergen Institute.

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