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Changes in Local People’s Perceptions of the Sumava National Park in the Czech Republic over a Ten Year Period (1998–2008)

Author

Listed:
  • Tomas Gorner

    () (Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Benatska Street, Prague, 12801, Czech Republic
    Agency for Nature Conservation and Landscape Protection of the Czech Republic, Kaplanova Street, Prague, 14800, Czech Republic)

  • Klara Najmanova

    (Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Benatska Street, Prague, 12801, Czech Republic)

  • Martin Cihar

    () (Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Benatska Street, Prague, 12801, Czech Republic)

Abstract

The Sumava National Park (NP), the largest protected area of its kind in Central Europe, is as interesting as it is problematic (historical development, conflicts between regional development and landscape protection). In order to evaluate the success of the Park’s policies, local park inhabitants’ attitudes were assessed over a ten-year period. Two surveys (N = 181 and N = 200) were conducted in August, 1998 and 2008. The questionnaires consisted of 43 queries from three thematic areas; (a) socio-demographic data, (b) environment and nature conservation, and (c) sustainable tourism and local development. The comparison of the results 1998 with 2008 showed that the Park inhabitants perceived living in the Park as improving and the scheme for nature conservation as either “optimal” or “more strict”. The surveys also showed the loss of job opportunities as the most prevalent local concern. In a cluster analysis based on perceptions of (a) the Park, (b) the environment and (c) Park Administration, subjects were divided into four opinion groups ranging from “optimists” to “grumblers”. The most “positive (optimistic)” group saw little connection between the Park’s existence and job losses, while the most “negative” group saw a strong connection in that regard.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Gorner & Klara Najmanova & Martin Cihar, 2012. "Changes in Local People’s Perceptions of the Sumava National Park in the Czech Republic over a Ten Year Period (1998–2008)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(6), pages 1-17, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:6:p:1354-1370:d:18426
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Coria, Jessica & Calfucura, Enrique, 2012. "Ecotourism and the development of indigenous communities: The good, the bad, and the ugly," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 47-55.
    2. Fisher, Brendan & Christopher, Treg, 2007. "Poverty and biodiversity: Measuring the overlap of human poverty and the biodiversity hotspots," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 93-101, April.
    3. Bonaiuto, Marino & Carrus, Giuseppe & Martorella, Helga & Bonnes, Mirilia, 2002. "Local identity processes and environmental attitudes in land use changes: The case of natural protected areas," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 631-653, October.
    4. repec:eee:touman:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:64-73 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaqueline Garcia-Yi, 2015. "Drugs and Protected Areas: Coca Cultivation and Social Acceptance of Bahuaja-Sonene National Park in Peru," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(6), pages 1-27, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    protected areas; resident’s attitudes; sustainable management; social climate;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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