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Technological Factors That Influence the Mathematics Performance of Secondary School Students

Author

Listed:
  • Melchor Gómez-García

    (Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), 28049 Madrid, Spain)

  • Hassan Hossein-Mohand

    (Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), 28049 Madrid, Spain)

  • Juan Manuel Trujillo-Torres

    (Department of Didactics and School Organization, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Universidad de Granada (UGR), 18071 Granada, Spain)

  • Hossein Hossein-Mohand

    (Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), 28049 Madrid, Spain)

  • Inmaculada Aznar-Díaz

    (Department of Didactics and School Organization, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Universidad de Granada (UGR), 18071 Granada, Spain)

Abstract

Although the value of information and communication technology (ICT) is positive and its use is widespread, its potential as a teaching tool in mathematics is not optimized and its methodological integration is rare. In addition, the availability of ICT resources in schools is positively associated with the academic success of students, and the availability of ICT resources at home is negatively associated with their success. To determine the relationships among academic performance, uses, and available ICT resources, a total of 2018 secondary school students participated in the present study. The uses and available ICT resources, and the learning of mathematics and ICT, were evaluated using a validated 11-item questionnaire. Statistical analysis reveals that, of the secondary education levels, the lowest results are observed in the third year. A total of 64% of students affirm that they use ICT at home to study mathematics. In addition, 33.61% of the students affirm that they use their mobile phones frequently while studying at home. However, it should be noted that between 23.80% and 28.44% affirm that they dedicate more than 4 h per day to phone calls. Educational level is a predictor of academic performance in mathematics associated with students’ uses of ICT. The scores indicate that the computer is generally used for Internet searches, thus, limiting the use of ICT for educational purposes. Furthermore, there is a difference regarding gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Melchor Gómez-García & Hassan Hossein-Mohand & Juan Manuel Trujillo-Torres & Hossein Hossein-Mohand & Inmaculada Aznar-Díaz, 2020. "Technological Factors That Influence the Mathematics Performance of Secondary School Students," Mathematics, MDPI, vol. 8(11), pages 1-14, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jmathe:v:8:y:2020:i:11:p:1935-:d:439133
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Melchor Gómez-García & Roberto Soto-Varela & Juan Agustín Morón-Marchena & María José del Pino-Espejo, 2020. "Using Mobile Devices for Educational Purposes in Compulsory Secondary Education to Improve Student’s Learning Achievements," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(9), pages 1-12, May.
    2. Seraphim Dempsey & Seán Lyons & Selina McCoy, 2019. "Later is better: mobile phone ownership and child academic development, evidence from a longitudinal study," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(8), pages 798-815, November.
    3. Dempsey, Seraphim & Lyons, Séan & McCoy, Selina, 2019. "Later is better: Mobile phone ownership and child academic development," Papers RB201903, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Maximilian Weber & Birgit Becker, 2019. "Browsing the Web for School: Social Inequality in Adolescents’ School-Related Use of the Internet," SAGE Open, , vol. 9(2), pages 21582440198, June.
    5. Francisco Javier Ballesta Pagán & Josefina Lozano Martínez & Mari Carmen Cerezo Máiquez, 2018. "Internet Use by Secondary School Students: A Digital Divide in Sustainable Societies?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(10), pages 1-14, October.
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    1. Sana Sadiq & Khadija Anasse & Najib Slimani, 2022. "The impact of mobile phones on high school students: connecting the research dots," Technium Social Sciences Journal, Technium Science, vol. 30(1), pages 252-270, April.
    2. Cheruiyot Benard Kipkurui & Japheth Ododa Origa & Augustine Mwangi Gatotoh, 2024. "The Use of Descriptive Written Feedback for Enhancing Students’ Mathematics Achievement," International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science, International Journal of Research and Innovation in Social Science (IJRISS), vol. 8(2), pages 1567-1573, February.

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