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Quality-of-Life Evaluation among the Oldest-Old in China under the “Active Aging Framework”

Author

Listed:
  • Xin Xu

    (Population Research Institute, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210042, China)

  • Yuan Zhao

    (Ginling College, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097, China)

  • Jianfang Zhou

    (Population Research Institute, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210042, China)

  • Siyou Xia

    (Key Laboratory of Regional Sustainable Development Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China)

Abstract

China is facing an increasingly contradictory challenge between growing demand for health services for the oldest-old and the unbalanced and inadequate development in the context of rapid population aging. This study sought to evaluate the quality of life of the oldest-old in China under the active aging framework. Health, participation, and security data were sourced from China Statistics/Labor Statistics/Civil Affairs Yearbook 2000–2016 and National 1% Sample Survey Data 2005–2015. Then, we used the current life table, entropy method, coefficient variation, and panel data regression to evaluate the quality of life among the oldest-old and reveal its regional differences and mechanisms. The results show: (1) From 2005 to 2015, the overall quality of life in China steadily improved, and the quality of health, participation, and security of the oldest-old increased by 6.06%, 5.64%, and 47.48%, respectively. (2) Distinct regional disparities exist in the distribution of quality of life for the oldest-old in China; the “east–northeast–middle–west” stepped-declining pattern existed stably. (3) Population and family structure, economic development, and social security were the main reasons for the regional differences in quality of life for the oldest-old. Narrowing the socioeconomic gap between regions, promoting the function of family pension, and improving social old-age service supply will help improve the quality of life of the oldest-old.

Suggested Citation

  • Xin Xu & Yuan Zhao & Jianfang Zhou & Siyou Xia, 2022. "Quality-of-Life Evaluation among the Oldest-Old in China under the “Active Aging Framework”," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(8), pages 1-15, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jijerp:v:19:y:2022:i:8:p:4572-:d:790946
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yuvisthi Naidoo, 2019. "A Multi-dimensional Individual Well-Being Framework: With an Application to Older Australians," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 581-608, December.
    2. Nam Xuan Vo & Trung Quang Vo & Somtip Watanapongvanich & Nopphol Witvorapong, 2019. "Measurement and Determinants of Quality of Life of Older Adults in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 1285-1303, April.
    3. Liliya Leopold & Henriette Engelhardt, 2013. "Erratum to: Education and physical health trajectories in old age. Evidence from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(2), pages 329-329, April.
    4. Liliya Leopold & Henriette Engelhartdt, 2013. "Education and physical health trajectories in old age. Evidence from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(1), pages 23-31, February.
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